maniac

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ma·ni·ac

 (mā′nē-ăk′)
n.
1. A psychotic or otherwise mentally ill person who exhibits violent or bizarre behavior. Not used in psychiatric diagnosis.
2. A person who has an excessive enthusiasm or desire for something: a sports maniac.
3. A person who acts in a wildly irresponsible way: maniacs on the highway.
adj.
Variant of maniacal.

[From Late Latin maniacus, maniacal, from Greek maniakos, from maniā, madness; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

maniac

(ˈmeɪnɪˌæk)
n
1. a wild disorderly person
2. a person who has a great craving or enthusiasm for something: a football maniac.
3. (Psychiatry) psychiatry obsolete a person afflicted with mania
[C17: from Late Latin maniacus belonging to madness, from Greek]

ma•ni•ac

(ˈmeɪ niˌæk)

n.
1. an insane person; lunatic.
2. an overly zealous or enthusiastic person.
adj.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin maniacus possessed by mania < Late Greek maniakós. See mania, -ac]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maniac - an insane person
crazy, looney, loony, nutcase, weirdo - someone deranged and possibly dangerous
bedlamite - an archaic term for a lunatic
pyromaniac - a person with a mania for setting things on fire
madwoman - a woman lunatic
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
2.maniac - a person who has an obsession with or excessive enthusiasm for something
fancier, enthusiast - a person having a strong liking for something
Adj.1.maniac - wildly disorderedmaniac - wildly disordered; "a maniacal frenzy"
insane - afflicted with or characteristic of mental derangement; "was declared insane"; "insane laughter"

maniac

noun
1. madman or madwoman, psycho (slang), lunatic, loony (slang), psychopath, nutter (Brit. slang), basket case (slang), nutcase (slang), headcase (informal), headbanger (informal) a drug-crazed maniac
2. fanatic, fan, enthusiast, freak (informal), fiend (informal) big spending football maniacs

maniac

noun
A person who is ardently devoted to a particular subject or activity:
Informal: buff, fan, fiend.
Slang: freak, nut.
adjective
Afflicted with or exhibiting irrationality and mental unsoundness:
Informal: bonkers, cracked, daffy, gaga, loony.
Chiefly British: crackers.
Idioms: around the bend, crazy as a loon, mad as a hatter, not all there, nutty as a fruitcake, off one's head, off one's rocker, of unsound mind, out of one's mind, sick in the head, stark raving mad.
Translations
مَجْنُونمَجْنون، مَهْووس
maniak
vanvittig person
maanikkoraivohullu
מניאקמשוגע
manijak
dühöngõ õrült
brjálæîingur
狂人
미치광이
maniak
vettvilling
คนคลั่ง
manyakmanyak kimse
người điên

maniac

[ˈmeɪnɪæk]
A. ADJmaníaco
B. N
1.maníaco/a m/f
he drives like a maniacconduce como un loco
2. (fig) (= enthusiast) → fanático/a m/f, maniático/a m/f
these sports maniacsestos fanáticos or maniáticos del deporte

maniac

[ˈmeɪniæk] n
(= mad person) → maniaque mf
She was attacked by a maniac with a knife → Elle a été agressée par un maniaque avec un couteau.
He drives like a maniac
BUT Il conduit comme un fou.
I worked like a maniac
BUT J'ai travaillé comme un dingue.
(= fanatic) a religious maniac → un(e) fanatique religieux/euse
a baseball maniac → un(e) mordu(e) du base-ball

maniac

adjwahnsinnig
n
Wahnsinnige(r) mf, → Irre(r) mf
(fig) these sports maniacsdiese Sportfanatiker pl; you maniacdu bist ja wahnsinnig!

maniac

[ˈmeɪnɪæk] nmaniaco/a
sports maniac (fig) (fam) → maniaco/a dello sport
he drives like a maniac! → guida come un pazzo!

mania

(ˈmeiniə) noun
1. a form of mental illness in which the sufferer is over-active, over-excited, and unreasonably happy.
2. an unreasonable enthusiasm for something. He has a mania for fast cars.
ˈmaniac (-ӕk) noun
an insane (and dangerous) person; a madman. He drives like a maniac.
manic (ˈmӕnik) adjective
1. of, or suffering from, mania. She's in a manic state.
2. extremely energetic, active and excited. The new manager is one of those manic people who can't rest even for a minute.

maniac

مَجْنُون maniak vanvittig person Verrückter μανιακός maníaco raivohullu dingue manijak folle 狂人 미치광이 maniak gærning maniak maníaco маньяк vettvilling คนคลั่ง manyak người điên 疯子

ma·ni·ac

a. maníaco-a, persona afectada de manía.
References in classic literature ?
By this time the cloud of dust had swept on as if hurried along by a blast, and a band of wild horsemen came dashing at full leap into the camp, yelling and whooping like so many maniacs.
Each sang his indictive narrative in turn, accompanied by the whole orchestra of sixty instruments, and when this had continued for some time, and one was hoping they might come to an understanding and modify the noise, a great chorus composed entirely of maniacs would suddenly break forth, and then during two minutes, and sometimes three, I lived over again all that I suffered the time the orphan asylum burned down.
And always in their swift and deadly rushes to and fro the men screamed and yelled like maniacs.
In fact, he had a comfortable feeling that he was vastly superior to these wordy maniacs of the working class.
And John Barleycorn puts out the fire, and soddens the agility, and, when he does not more immediately kill them or make maniacs of them, he coarsens and grossens them, twists and malforms them out of the original goodness and fineness of their natures.
Bertha Mason is mad; and she came of a mad family; idiots and maniacs through three generations?
Whites of the eyes showing all around the irises, hair growing stiffly erect from the scalp and low down upon the forehead--even their mannerisms and their carriage are those of maniacs.
My objections to this, that the present inhabitants of England are mentally fit, and could therefore not have descended from an ancestry of undiluted lunacy he brushes aside with the assertion that insanity is not necessarily hereditary; and that even though it was, in many cases a return to natural conditions from the state of high civilization, which is thought to have induced mental disease in the ancient world, would, after several generations, have thoroughly expunged every trace of the affliction from the brains and nerves of the descendants of the original maniacs.
Yes, my dear Monsieur Pierre, I owe you a fine votive candle for saving me from that maniac.
In the cell next to him was a drunken wife-beater and in the one beyond a yelling maniac.
I do not recall what I said or did, but I know that for an instant I was seized with the rage of a maniac.
Quick, guardsmen, to the pits with the black maniac who wishes to throw his life away for a poor joke upon your ruler