mannish

(redirected from mannishness)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to mannishness: masculinity

man·nish

 (măn′ĭsh)
adj.
1. Of or relating to men; masculine: "As a junior tennis player ... I felt betrayed at around fourteen when so many of these single-minded flailing boys became abruptly mannish and tall" (David Foster Wallace)."It was better for a woman ... to stand back, keep quiet, and let the men work out their mannish problems" (Maya Angelou).
2. Imitative or suggestive of a man rather than a woman: "Her ring sinks into the fourth finger of her square, mannish hands" (Mary Gordon).

man′nish·ly adv.
man′nish·ness n.

mannish

(ˈmænɪʃ)
adj
1. (of a woman) having or displaying qualities regarded as typical of a man
2. of or resembling a man
ˈmannishly adv
ˈmannishness n

man•nish

(ˈmæn ɪʃ)

adj.
being typical or suggestive of a man rather than a woman.
[1300–50]
man′nish•ly, adv.
man′nish•ness, n.
syn: See manly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mannish - resembling or imitative of or suggestive of a man rather than a woman; "a mannish stride"
unwomanly - not womanly; "the logical clearness of her arguments...condemned her as eccentric and unwomanly"
2.mannish - characteristic of a man as distinguished from a womanmannish - characteristic of a man as distinguished from a woman; "true mannish arrogance"
masculine - associated with men and not with women

mannish

adjective manlike, masculine, unfeminine, butch (informal), unladylike, unwomanly She shook hands in a mannish way.

mannish

adjective
Of, characteristic of, or befitting the male sex:
Translations

mannish

[ˈmænɪʃ] ADJhombruno

mannish

adj woman, clothesmännlich wirkend

mannish

[ˈmænɪʃ] adj (pej) → mascolino/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, it suggests that her lifelong myth of mannishness may be traced back to her early acquaintance with soldiers.
There is a nautical theme to some of the pieces with a decidedly Katharine Hepburn mannishness which looks great on deck, on shore or simply shopping along the quayside.
If female fashion was exercised by the New Woman's alleged mannishness, was there a perceptible reaction in male dress (and stage performance) to the spectre of effeminacy foregrounded by Wilde's delinquencies but a matter of mounting anxiety over several decades?