manticore

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Related to Manticores: basilisks

man·ti·core

 (măn′tĭ-kôr′)
n.
A legendary monster having the head of a man, the body of a lion, and the tail of a dragon or scorpion.

[Middle English manticores, from Latin mantichōra, from Greek mantikhōras, variant of martiokhōras, from Old Iranian *martiya-khvāra-, man-eater : *martiya-, man; see mer- in Indo-European roots + *-khvāra-, eater; see swel- in Indo-European roots.]

manticore

(ˈmæntɪˌkɔː)
n
(Non-European Myth & Legend) a monster with a lion's body, a scorpion's tail, and a man's head with three rows of teeth. It roamed the jungles of India and, like the Sphinx, would ask travellers a riddle and kill them when they failed to answer it
[C21: from Latin manticora, from Greek mantichōrās, corruption of martichorās, from Persian mardkhora man-eater]

man•ti•core

(ˈmæn tɪˌkɔr, -ˌkoʊr)

n.
a legendary monster with a man's head, a lion's body, and the tail of a dragon or a scorpion.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin mantichōrās < Greek]

manticore

a mythical or fabulous beast with the head of a man, the body of a lion or tiger, and the feet and tail of a dragon or scorpion. Also spelled mantichora.
See also: Animals
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.manticore - a mythical monster having the head of man (with horns) and the body of a lion and the tail of a scorpionmanticore - a mythical monster having the head of man (with horns) and the body of a lion and the tail of a scorpion
mythical creature, mythical monster - a monster renowned in folklore and myth
References in periodicals archive ?
Adventure and danger await players as they meet legendary heroes like Eagilles and Hawkules while squaring up against fearsome enemies like Manticores, Ettins and even Medusa the Gorgon.
The idea for this one arrived unexpectedly when I was staring out a bus window, and from memory I don't think there were any unicorns or manticores galloping past at the time (especially since this would have constituted a bold misuse of the transit lane).
Youngsters ventured to the Centre For Children's Books to find out about different scary creatures, from manticores and unicorns, to griffins and centaurs and decide which ones are good or evil.