Manuel I


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Manuel I

(Portuguese maˈnwel)
n
(Biography) called the Fortunate. 1469–1521, king of Portugal (1495–1521); his reign saw the discovery of Brazil and the beginning of Portuguese trade with India and the East
References in periodicals archive ?
Portuguese royal parades were only significantly changed by the Discoveries in the reign of King Manuel I (1495-1521), when elements of the African and Asian exotic were incorporated in these ceremonies.
From Manuel I onwards, the so called "Indo-Portuguese" saltcellars, Chinese porcelains, and a variety of artefacts produced with exotic materials like crystal, coral and jasper were added to the previous African ivory pieces and extended the diversity of non-European material culture associated to the act of feasting (20).
However, it was once again Manuel I who introduced an exacerbation of this tendency, namely with the splendid mission of obedience that was sent to Rome after the election of Pope Leo X, in 1513.
The reign of Manuel I (1495-1521) was an era of dynamic change in terms of administration and governance.
9) But although the scope for autonomous action by the conselho real declined under the strong leadership of both Joao II (1481-95) and Manuel I, it appears that royal councillors continued to provide their stated service of providing counsel and offering advice to their sovereign kings well into the sixteenth century.
The writings of thinkers such as Sir John Fortescue and Claude de Seyssel, who took up these issues elsewhere in Europe, were echoed in Portugal with the vehemently quarreling treatises of Antonio de Beja and Antonio Pereira Marramaque that emerged in the years immediately following the death of Manuel I.
During the early years of his reign, there is evidence that Manuel I also used the council as a mechanism to lend legitimacy to his political actions.
The enormity of the administrative reforms undertaken by Manuel I during his reign meant that he would have been compelled to solicit the advice of his officials and his politically experienced councillors.
For example, in 1513, the aposentadorias of these three cities came under the direct control of Joao Fogaca, one of the vedores da fazenda to Manuel I.
In the past, historians have assumed that Manuel I made little use of the conselho real, drastically inflating numbers of royal councilors to the point that the position had become merely honorific.