Marcos

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Related to Marco: Marco Polo

Mar·cos

 (mär′kōs), Ferdinand Edralin 1917-1989.
Philippine president (1965-1986) who maintained close ties with the United States and exercised dictatorial control over his country. After a fraudulent presidential election against Corazón Aquino (1986) he fled the Philippines with his wife, Imelda (born 1929).

Marcos

(ˈmɑːkɒs)
n
1. (Biography) Ferdinand (Edralin). 1917–89, Filipino statesman; president of the Philippines from 1965; deposed and exiled in 1986
2. (Biography) his wife, Imelda (Remedios Visitacion Trinidad Romualdez). born 1929, Filipino politician; governor of Manila (1976–86); notorious for her profligacy as first lady

Mar•cos

(ˈmɑr koʊs)

n.
Ferdinand E(dralin), 1917–1989, Philippine politician: president 1965–86.
References in classic literature ?
I dropped in there while Marco, the son of Marco, was haggling with a shopkeeper over a quarter of a pound of salt, and asked for change for a twenty-dollar gold piece.
Marco was very proud of having such a man for a friend.
The raiment of Marco and his wife was of coarse tow-linen and linsey-woolsey respectively, and resembled township maps, it being made up pretty exclusively of patches which had been added, township by township, in the course of five or six years, until hardly a hand's-breadth of the original garments was surviving and present.
There is use also of ambitious men, in pulling down the greatness of any subject that overtops; as Tiberius used Marco, in the pulling down of Sejanus.
Colonel Sir Henry Yule, The Book of Sir Marco Polo.
What mind, that is not wholly barbarous and uncultured, can find pleasure in reading of how a great tower full of knights sails away across the sea like a ship with a fair wind, and will be to-night in Lombardy and to-morrow morning in the land of Prester John of the Indies, or some other that Ptolemy never described nor Marco Polo saw?
Marco Compioni was the architect who designed the wonderful structure more than five hundred years ago, and it took him forty-six years to work out the plan and get it ready to hand over to the builders.
Newman led his usual life, made acquaintances, took his ease in the galleries and churches, spent an unconscionable amount of time in strolling in the Piazza San Marco, bought a great many bad pictures, and for a fortnight enjoyed Venice grossly.
Marco Polo had seen the inhabitants of Zipangu place rose-coloured pearls in the mouths of the dead.
Without streets and vehicles, the uproar of wheels, the brutality of horses, and with its little winding ways where people crowd together, where voices sound as in the corridors of a house, where the human step circulates as if it skirted the angles of furniture and shoes never wear out, the place has the character of an immense collective apartment, in which Piazza San Marco is the most ornamented corner and palaces and churches, for the rest, play the part of great divans of repose, tables of entertainment, expanses of decoration.
But in Italy I am Marco Facino Cane, Prince of Varese.
Into these pavilions he admitted the elect, and there, says Marco Polo, gave them to eat a certain herb, which transported them to Paradise, in the midst of ever-blooming shrubs, ever-ripe fruit, and ever-lovely virgins.