tax rate

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tax rate

n
(Economics) the percentage of income, wealth, etc, assessed as payable in taxation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tax rate - rate used to calculate tax liability
charge per unit, rate - amount of a charge or payment relative to some basis; "a 10-minute phone call at that rate would cost $5"
References in periodicals archive ?
The new plan is a clear departure from the budget-busting proposals advanced by Republican presidential candidates over the past year and reflects a coherent approach to lowering statutory tax rates; maintaining a progressive income tax; and dramatically reducing the marginal tax rate on new investment, a reform likely to spur a substantial increase in new investment.
This will prevent around 500,000 taxpayers going onto the higher 37 per cent marginal tax rate.
Inherent in this definition of an income-based cliff effect is the existence of, for at least some portion of the additional income, a marginal tax rate greater than 100%.
Stabile (2004) uses Canadian micro-level data for the period 1990-1996 and finds that a higher marginal tax rate has a negative effect on the decision to be self-employed.
Furthermore, marginal tax rate cuts in 2001 and 2003 were followed by the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.
As a point of clarification, members need to be aware that cashing out annual leave has taxation implications depending on your current marginal rate, how close to the next marginal rate your salary is, and if the amount you are cashing out will take you into another marginal tax rate.
It said the marginal tax rate faced by those with an earner between PS50,000 and PS60,000 would rise by 11 per cent for those with one child and another seven for each additional child.
According to "The Tax Benefits and Revenue Costs of Tax Deferral" study by the Investment Company Institute (ICI), in realistic simulations for a variety of investments, the tax benefits from a one-time $1 contribution to a retirement account are greater for a 45-year-old with a 15% marginal tax rate than for a 60-year-old in the 35% tax bracket.
The marginal tax rate is the rate paid in taxes on each additional dollar of income earned.
A decrease in the marginal tax rate that raised the after-tax share of income by 1 percent raised reported taxable income by 0.
I did not suggest in my February editorial, or elsewhere, that the principal portion of investments, which "were first earned as wages," should be taxed, but that the earnings on these investments should be taxed at the taxpayer's marginal tax rate, not at preferential (lower) capital gains rates.