Marie Tussaud


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Marie Tussaud: Marie Antoinette, Madame du Barry
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marie Tussaud - French modeler (resident in England after 1802) who made wax death masks of prominent victims of the French Revolution and toured Britain with her wax modelsMarie Tussaud - French modeler (resident in England after 1802) who made wax death masks of prominent victims of the French Revolution and toured Britain with her wax models; in 1835 she opened a permanent waxworks exhibition in London (1761-1850)
References in periodicals archive ?
1761: Madame Marie Tussaud, wax-works modeller, was born in Strasbourg.
Waxwork model of Madame Tussaud 1761: Waxworks modeller Madame Marie Tussaud was born in Strasbourg.
Wax sculptor and founder of Madame Tussauds, Marie Tussaud, wore a happy look.
1850: Death of Marie Tussaud, Swiss-born modeller who established the world-famous waxworks near Baker Street, London, in 1835.
STRASBOURG-BORN wax modeller Marie Tussaud died at the age of 88.
He gives clear illustrations drawn from the real world, from President Obama and the Tea Party, to the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary, to the rise of unlikely luminaries such as Marie Tussaud.
The story of this wax museum started in the Paris of 1770, where Madame Marie Tussaud learnt to model wax likenesses under the tutelage of her mentor, Dr Philippe Curtius.
1761: Madame Marie Tussaud, waxworks modeller, was born in Strasbourg.
Swiss-French Marie Tussaud moved to Paris in the middle of the French Revolution and took a job making wax death masks of the victims of the guillotine, including Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI.
he museum was founded by wax sculptor Marie Tussaud and has become a major tourist destination.
They then had an area showing the history of how Marie Tussaud started to create the waxworks with examples of models and photographs and also models in various stages of work which gave a great insight into how everything was done.
From the arrival of Marie Tussaud in England with thirty wax figures to the coronation of Elizabeth II and the advent of mass television, the author describes a past that differs very much from the "Merrie" and rural England we often envision.