Marie de France


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Marie de France

(French mari də frɑ̃s)
n
(Biography) 12th century ad, French poet, who probably lived in England; noted for her lais (verse narratives) based on Celtic tales
References in periodicals archive ?
I argue that this image of a man living without gender--but who nevertheless is seen as virtuous--offers a deconstructionist critique of gender expectations, and because of its appearance in Medieval England, it also positions Marie de France as one of the earliest feminist writers in literature.
Of the twelve lais attributed to Marie de France found in the Harley 978 manuscript, some form of the word merveille, appears in eleven of them.
Obscurity is central to the literary mode and mission of Marie de France.
Eleven essays written by Marie de France scholars address various aspects of the 12th-century writer, a woman, and a prominent literary voice in the 12th century who wrote in French and translated Aesop's fables from English, among other achievements.
Wolfborn takes as its source material a twelfth-century story by Marie de France Lai Le Bisclavret, from a collection called Breton Lais.
Potkay's exposition of these points reveals the richness of all the texts involved and persuasively advances her thesis that "Jesus taught not only the apostles, but Marie de France, too, to speak in parables.
The twelve lais attributed to Marie de France are much studied, but less attention has been paid to the larger number of Old French lais whose authorship is non-attributed.
Moving from gifts to literary exchange, Margaret Burland's essay on Galeran de Bretagne focuses on the narrative cloth woven by Gente, and worn by her abandoned daughter Fresne, in this thirteenth-century verse romance inspired by Marie de France.
Handout from The Lais of Marie De France, edited by Robert W.
Porter accords Woolf a place in this tradition, along with Sappho, Marie de France, Madame de Stael, Mary Shelley, Marguerite Yourcenar, and Christa Wolf.
A l'aide, d'une part, d'analyses detaillees d'extraits de poemes, de descriptions et de portraits et, d'autre part, d'erudits paralleles devoilant les echos intertextuels que les textes consideres contiennent, Laurence Porter entreprend, dans une argumentation complexe, d'identifier les points communs entre des oeuvres aussi variees que celles de Sappho, Marie de France, Madame de Stael, Mary Shelley, Virginia Woolf, Marguerite Yourcenar et Christa Wolf.
In this study of remarkable breadth and brilliant depth, Sappho joins Wolf in an "empathic community" including five other major women writers: Marie de France, Germaine de Stael, Mary Shelley, Virginia Woolf, and Marguerite Yourcenar.