Marks


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Related to Marks: Quotation marks, Punctuation marks

mark 1

 (märk)
n.
1. A visible trace or impression, such as a line or spot: a spill that left a mark on the rug; a mark next to each purchased item on the list.
2. A symbol, name, or other identifier, especially:
a. A name, logo, or other indicator used to indicate ownership, origin, or level of quality.
b. A notch made in an animal's ear or hide to indicate ownership.
c. A sign, such as a cross, made in lieu of a signature.
3. A written or printed symbol used for punctuation; a punctuation mark.
4.
a. A number, letter, or symbol used to indicate various grades of academic achievement: got a mark of 95 instead of 100.
b. often marks An appraisal; a rating: earned high marks from her superiors.
5. Nautical
a. A knot or piece of material placed at various measured lengths on a sounding line to indicate the depth of the water.
b. A Plimsoll mark.
6.
a. A distinctive trait or property: Good manners are the mark of a civilized person.
b. A recognized standard of quality: schoolwork that is not up to the mark.
c. A lasting effect: The experience had left its mark on all of us.
d. A specific model, type, or iteration, as of a product or machine, especially when part of a series. Usually used with a number: the mark IV model of this car.
7.
a. Importance; prominence: "a fellow of no mark nor likelihood" (Shakespeare).
b. Notice; attention: a matter unworthy of mark.
8. A target: "A mounted officer would be a conspicuous mark" (Ambrose Bierce).
9. Something that one wishes to achieve; a goal.
10. An object or point that serves as a guide.
11. Slang A person who is the intended victim of a swindler; a dupe.
12.
a. Sports The place from which racers begin and sometimes end their contest.
b. A point reached or gained: the halfway mark of the race.
c. A record: set a new mark in the long jump.
13. Sports
a. A strike or spare in bowling.
b. A stationary ball in lawn bowling; a jack.
14. A boundary between countries.
15. A tract of land in medieval England and Germany held in common by a community.
16. Computers A character or feature in a file, record, or data stream used to locate a specific point or condition.
v. marked, mark·ing, marks
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a visible trace or impression on, as with a spot, line, or dent: marked the wall with a crayon.
b. To form, make, or depict by making a mark: marked a square on the board.
c. To supply with natural markings: gray fur that is marked with stripes.
2.
a. To single out or indicate by or as if by a mark: marked the spot where the treasure was buried; a career marked for glory.
b. To distinguish or characterize: the exuberance that marks her writings; marked the occasion with celebrations.
c. To make conspicuous: a concert marking the composer's 60th birthday.
3. To set off or separate by or as if by a line or boundary: marked off the limits of our property.
4. To attach or affix identification, such as a price tag or maker's label, to.
5. To evaluate (academic work) according to a scale of letters or numbers; grade.
6.
a. To give attention to; notice: Mark her expression of discontent. Mark my words: they are asking for trouble.
b. To take note of in writing; write down: marked the appointment on my calendar.
c. Sports & Games To record (the score) in various games.
7. Sports To guard (an opponent), as in soccer.
v.intr.
1. To make a visible impression: This pen will mark under water.
2. To receive a visible impression: The floor marks easily.
3. Sports & Games To keep score.
4. To determine academic grades: a teacher who marks strictly.
Phrasal Verbs:
mark down
To mark for sale at a lower price.
mark up
1. To deface by covering with marks.
2. To mark for sale at a higher price.
Idioms:
beside the mark
Beside the point; irrelevant.
mark time
1. To move the feet alternately in the rhythm of a marching step without advancing.
2. To suspend progress for the time being; wait in readiness.
3. To function in an apathetic or ineffective manner.

[Middle English, from Old English mearc; see merg- in Indo-European roots.]

mark 2

 (märk)
n.
1. An English and Scottish unit of currency that was equal to 13 shillings and 4 pence.
2. Any of several European units of weight that were equal to about 8 ounces (227 grams), used especially for weighing gold and silver.
3. A deutsche mark.
4. A markka.

[Middle English, from Old English marc; see merg- in Indo-European roots. Sense 3, translation of German Mark, from Middle High German marc, marke, stamped precious metal bar, half-pound of silver or gold. Sense 4, translation of Finnish markka.]

Mark 1

 (märk)
n.
See Table at Bible.

Mark 2

 (märk)
n.
In Arthurian legend, a king of Cornwall who was the husband of Iseult and the uncle of her lover Tristan.

Mark

, Saint.
Author of the second Gospel in the New Testament and disciple of Saint Peter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Marks - English businessman who created a retail chain (1888-1964)
Translations
References in classic literature ?
So you keep an account of my good and bad marks in Brooke's face, do you?
She had the dream three times, then she became in the family way to the one who said noth- ing at all but who in the moment of his passion actually did bite her shoulder so that for days the marks of his teeth showed.
Only papers in the yellow silk-papers with queer marks on.
It would seem that the domestics had been previously instructed; for, instead of penetrating the thicket, they followed the route of the column; a measure which Heyward stated had been dictated by the sagacity of their guide, in order to diminish the marks of their trail, if, haply, the Canadian savages should be lurking so far in advance of their army.
There were many rumors, some of which have vaguely drifted down to the present time, how that appearances indicated violence; that there were the marks of fingers on his throat, and the print of a bloody hand on his plaited ruff; and that his peaked beard was dishevelled, as if it had been fiercely clutched and pulled.
What do we talk of marks and brands, whether on the bodice of her gown or the flesh of her forehead?
that common highway all over dented with the marks of slavish heels and hoofs; and turned me to admire the magnanimity of the sea which will permit no records.
I have several such dried bits, which I use for marks in my whale-books.
We heard afterward that he had given his evidence so clearly, and the horses were in such an exhausted state, bearing marks of such brutal usage, that the carter was committed to take his trial, and might possibly be sentenced to two or three months in prison.
He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his way upward in the world.
A German gentleman told me that when he remained a week in a hotel, he gave the portier five marks, the head waiter four, the Boots three, and the chambermaid two; and if he stayed three months he divided ninety marks among them, in about the above proportions.
Wilson's got a scheme for driving plain window glass panes out of the market by decorating it with greasy finger marks, and getting rich by selling it at famine prices to the crowned heads over in Europe to outfit their palaces with.