marseilles


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Mar·seille

also Mar·seilles  (mär-sā′)
A city of southeast France on the Gulf of Lion west-northwest of Toulon. The oldest city of France, it was founded c. 600 bc by Greeks from Asia Minor and overrun by Germanic tribes in the 5th and 6th centuries ad. Marseille became independent in the 1200s and passed to France in 1481. Today it is an industrial center and a major seaport.

mar•seilles

(mɑrˈseɪlz)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a thick cotton fabric woven with an embossed effect.
[1755–65; after Marseilles]

Mar•seilles

(mɑrˈseɪ)

n.
a seaport in SE France, on the Gulf of Lions. 1,110,511. French, Mar•seille (marˈsɛ yə)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marseilles - a port city in southeastern France on the MediterraneanMarseilles - a port city in southeastern France on the Mediterranean
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Translations
Marselis
Marseille
Marsylia
Marsilia

Marseilles

[mɑːˈseɪlz] NMarsella f

Marseilles

[mɑːrˈseɪ] nMarseille

Marseilles

nMarseille nt

Marseilles

[mɑːˈseɪlz] nMarsiglia
References in classic literature ?
Immediately, and according to custom, the ramparts of Fort Saint-Jean were covered with spectators; it is always an event at Marseilles for a ship to come into port, especially when this ship, like the Pharaon, has been built, rigged, and laden at the old Phocee docks, and belongs to an owner of the city.
Scarcely was the captain's breath out of his body when he assumed the command without consulting any one, and he caused us to lose a day and a half at the Island of Elba, instead of making for Marseilles direct.
Asked me questions about the vessel, the time she left Marseilles, the course she had taken, and what was her cargo.
The shipowner, smiling, followed him with his eyes until he saw him spring out on the quay and disappear in the midst of the throng, which from five o'clock in the morning until nine o'clock at night, swarms in the famous street of La Canebiere, -- a street of which the modern Phocaeans are so proud that they say with all the gravity in the world, and with that accent which gives so much character to what is said, "If Paris had La Canebiere, Paris would be a second Marseilles.
There was a strike at Marseilles at the time, and Strickland, having come to the end of his resources, had apparently found it impossible to earn the small sum he needed to keep body and soul together.
They must have spent something like four months at Marseilles in one another's society.
I guess you'd better get out of Marseilles before Tough Bill comes out of hospital," he said to Strickland, when they had got back to the Chink's Head and were cleaning themselves.
I should not be surprised to learn that he had never seen Strickland in his life, and owed his knowledge of Marseilles to the pages of a magazine.
Thirty years ago, Marseilles lay burning in the sun, one day.
Everything in Marseilles, and about Marseilles, had stared at the fervid sky, and been stared at in return, until a staring habit had become universal there.
Hindoos, Russians, Chinese, Spaniards, Portuguese, Englishmen, Frenchmen, Genoese, Neapolitans, Venetians, Greeks, Turks, descendants from all the builders of Babel, come to trade at Marseilles, sought the shade alike--taking refuge in any hiding-place from a sea too intensely blue to be looked at, and a sky of purple, set with one great flaming jewel of fire.
From Gibraltar, running along the coasts of Spain and France, Marseilles will be reached in three days.