Marshals


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Related to Marshals: Ross, US Marshals, Michaels, Air Marshals

mar·shal

 (mär′shəl)
n.
1.
a. A military officer of the highest rank in some countries.
b. A field marshal.
2.
a. An officer of the courts of the United States who performs various duties such as protecting judges, transporting prisoners, and apprehending fugitives.
b. A public official who performs various duties for the courts of a city, such as enforcing orders for money judgments or evictions.
3. The head of a police or fire department in the United States.
4. A person in charge of a parade or ceremony.
5. A high official in a royal court, especially one aiding the sovereign in military affairs.
v. mar·shaled, mar·shal·ing, mar·shals also mar·shalled or mar·shal·ling
v.tr.
1. To arrange or place (troops, for example) in line for a parade, maneuver, or review.
2. To arrange, place, or set in methodical order: marshal facts in preparation for an exam. See Synonyms at arrange.
3. To enlist and organize: trying to marshal public support.
4. To guide ceremoniously; conduct or usher.
v.intr.
1. To take up positions in a military formation.
2. To take form or order: facts marshaling as research progressed.

[Middle English, from Old French mareschal, of Germanic origin; see marko- in Indo-European roots.]

mar′shal·cy, mar′shal·ship′ n.
Word History: The Germanic ancestor of Modern English marshal is a compound made up of *marhaz, "horse" (related to the source of our word mare), and *skalkaz, "servant," meaning as a whole literally "horse servant," hence "groom." The Frankish descendant of this Germanic word, *marahskalk, came to designate a high royal official and also a high military commander—not surprising given the importance of cavalry in medieval warfare. Along with many other Frankish words, *marahskalk was borrowed into Old French as mareschal in the early Middle Ages, when much of northern France was ruled by Frankish dynasties. Later, when the Normans established a French-speaking official class in England in the 11th century, the Old French term mareschal came with them. In the first known uses of the word in documents written in England, marshal was used with the meaning "farrier." (It was also recorded as a surname, and in the spelling Marshall, it still survives as such.) The word marshal eventually began to be used in a wider variety of meanings in Middle English, as it had been in Old French, and the term was applied in Middle English to high-ranking officers of the royal court and the courts of law.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.marshals - the United States' oldest federal law enforcement agency is responsible today for protecting the Federal Judiciary and transporting federal prisoners and protecting federal witnesses and managing assets seized from criminals and generally ensuring the effective operation of the federal judicial systemMarshals - the United States' oldest federal law enforcement agency is responsible today for protecting the Federal Judiciary and transporting federal prisoners and protecting federal witnesses and managing assets seized from criminals and generally ensuring the effective operation of the federal judicial system
Department of Justice, DoJ, Justice Department, Justice - the United States federal department responsible for enforcing federal laws (including the enforcement of all civil rights legislation); created in 1870
law enforcement agency - an agency responsible for insuring obedience to the laws
References in classic literature ?
Whether marching amid his aides and marshals in the van of countless cohorts that endlessly streamed it over the plains, like an Ohio; or whether with his circumambient subjects browsing all around at the horizon, the White Steed gallopingly reviewed them with warm nostrils reddening through his cool milkiness; in whatever aspect he presented himself, always to the bravest Indians he was the object of trembling reverence and awe.
The great gate is flung open, and the procession marches in, splendidly costumed and glittering: the marshals of the day, then the picadores on horseback, then the matadores on foot, each surrounded by his quadrille of CHULOS.
Others, which involved the rival claims of more elevated persons, were determined by the heralds, or by the two marshals of the field, William de Wyvil, and Stephen de Martival, who, armed at all points, rode up and down the lists to enforce and preserve good order among the spectators.
Bassompierre and Schomberg were marshals of France, and claimed their right of commanding the army under the orders of the king; but the cardinal, who feared that Bassompierre, a Huguenot at heart, might press but feebly the English and Rochellais, his brothers in religion, supported the Duc d'Angouleme, whom the king, at his instigation, had named lieutenant general.
As summer advances, he gives up his bachelor rambles, and bethinking himself of housekeeping duties, returns home to his mate and his new progeny, and marshals them all for the foraging expedition in quest of winter provisions.
So, as I did much more than I had been bidden to do, I was generously paid, for I was at length appointed captain of the musketeers, that is to say, the most envied position in court, which takes precedence over the marshals of France, and justly, for who says captain of the musketeers says the flower of chivalry and king of the brave.
The grand difficulty results from the invariably mistaken principles on which the deputy marshals seek to arrange this immense concourse of people, so much more numerous than those that train their interminable length through streets and highways in times of political excitement.
Moreover, he possessed the good friendship of Messire Tristan l'Hermite, provost of the marshals of the king's household.
Instead of him there were always a couple of orderlies--and that was all, excepting, of course, the generals and marshals whom Napoleon always took with him for the inspection of various localities, and for the sake of consultation generally.
I know," interrupted Bilibin, "you're thinking it's very easy to take marshals, sitting on a sofa by the fire
It enforced these laws by means of the police, the marshals, the militia and regular army, and the courts.
It would have been possible for us to secure the aid of United States marshals and board the English ship, backed by Government authority.