Marshalsea


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Related to Marshalsea: Little Dorrit, Marshalsea Court

Marshalsea

(ˈmɑːʃəlˌsiː)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849
2. (Law) (formerly in England) a court held before the knight marshal: abolished 1849
3. (Historical Terms) a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842
4. (Law) a prison for debtors and others, situated in Southwark, London: abolished in 1842
[C14: see marshal, -cy]
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References in classic literature ?
When he was ten years old his father was imprisoned for debt (like Micawber, in the Marshalsea prison), and he was put to work in the cellar of a London shoe-blacking factory.
Some of my readers may have an interest in being informed whether or no any portions of the Marshalsea Prison are yet standing.
But, whosoever goes into Marshalsea Place, turning out of Angel Court, leading to Bermondsey, will find his feet on the very paving-stones of the extinct Marshalsea jail; will see its narrow yard to the right and to the left, very little altered if at all, except that the walls were lowered when the place got free; will look upon rooms in which the debtors lived; and will stand among the crowding ghosts of many miserable years.
The condemned felon has as good a yard for air and exercise in Newgate, as the insolvent debtor in the Marshalsea Prison.
Many eyes, that have long since been closed in the grave, have looked round upon that scene lightly enough, when entering the gate of the old Marshalsea Prison for the first time; for despair seldom comes with the first severe shock of misfortune.
Within the Bifold Group, Marshalsea Hydraulics, is a leading designer and manufacturer of high quality pumps and valves, and provides a range of stainless steel pressure intensifiers for subsea and topside applications.
Which novel by Charles Dickens features the Marshalsea Prison?
Rapidly transplanted from the dismally enclosed world of the Marshalsea to the mainstream of society, the Dorrits eventually discover the world outside the Marshalsea to be equally as dismal, and equally as enclosed.
on the green earth"; (24) in Little Dorrit (1855-1857), the narrator's repeated references to Judgment that accompany Arthur Clennam's penitential growth in the Marshalsea prison; in Villette (1853), Lucy Snowe's desperate search for consolation that leads her to dabble in Catholic practices like confession and to consider the allure of purgatory.
When Arthur Clennam, recognizably a gentleman, attempts to discover the nature of the debt that is keeping William Dorrit in Marshalsea Prison, he is referred to the Circumlocution Office.
A fellmonger was arrested, and under the pretext of attending a play, a group of his fellow fellmongers gathered in order to free him from Marshalsea Prison.