synesthesia

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syn·es·the·sia

also syn·aes·the·sia  (sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
1. A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.
2. A sensation felt in one part of the body as a result of stimulus applied to another, as in referred pain.
3. The description of one kind of sense impression by using words that normally describe another.

syn′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.

synesthesia

(ˌsɪniːsˈθiːzɪə)
n
1. (Physiology) the usual US spelling of synaesthesia
2. (Psychology) the usual US spelling of synaesthesia
synesthetic adj

syn•es•the•sia

or syn•aes•the•sia

(ˌsɪn əsˈθi ʒə, -ʒi ə)

n.
a sensation produced in one modality when a stimulus is applied to another modality, as when the hearing of a certain sound induces the visualization of a certain color.
[1890–95; < New Latin; see syn-, esthesia]
syn′es•thete` (-ˌθit) n.
syn`es•thet′ic (-ˈθɛt ɪk) adj.

synesthesia, synaesthesia

Medicine. a secondary sensation accompanying an actual perception, as the perceiving of sound as a color or the sensation of being touched in a place at some distance from the actual place of touching. Cf. chromesthesia.synesthetic, synaesthetic, adj.
See also: Perception
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synesthesia - a sensation that normally occurs in one sense modality occurs when another modality is stimulated
aesthesis, esthesis, sensation, sense datum, sense experience, sense impression - an unelaborated elementary awareness of stimulation; "a sensation of touch"
chromaesthesia, chromesthesia - a form of synesthesia in which nonvisual stimulation results in the experience of color sensations
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
For many years the most influential descriptions of Martian colors were those provided around the turn of the century by Percival Lowell, who observed with a 24-inch Clark refractor at his private observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona.
There is no evidence, however, that either Lowell or Antoniadi ever considered simultaneous contrast as a possible source of error in their assessments of Martian colors.
Few opinions on the subject of Martian colors should carry more weight than those of University of Arizona astronomer William Hartmann.