Martin


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mar·tin

 (mär′tn)
n.
Any of various swallows, such as the house martin or the purple martin.

[Middle English martoune, probably from the name Martin.]

martin

(ˈmɑːtɪn)
n
(Animals) any of various swallows of the genera Progne, Delichon, Riparia, etc, having a square or slightly forked tail. See also house martin
[C15: perhaps from St Martin, because the birds were believed to migrate at the time of Martinmas]

Martin

(ˈmɑːtɪn)
n
1. (Biography) Archer John Porter. 1910–2002, British biochemist; Nobel prize for chemistry 1952 (with Richard Synge; 1914–94) for developing paper chromatography (1944). He subsequently developed gas chromatography (1953)
2. (Biography) Chris(topher Anthony John). born 1977, English rock musician; lead singer of Coldplay
3. (Biography) Frank. 1890–1974, Swiss composer. He used a modified form of the twelve-note technique in some of his works, which include Petite Symphonie Concertante (1946) and the oratorio Golgotha (1949)
4. (Biography) Sir George (Henry). born 1926, British record producer and arranger, noted for his work with the Beatles
5. (Biography) John. 1789–1854, British painter, noted for his visionary landscapes and large-scale works with biblical subjects
6. (Biography) Michael (John). Baron. born 1945, Scottish Labour politician; speaker of the House of Commons (2000–09)
7. (Biography) Paul (Edgar Philippe). born 1938, Canadian Liberal politician; prime minister of Canada (2003–06)
8. (Biography) Saint. called Saint Martin of Tours. ?316–?397 ad, bishop of Tours (?371–?397); a patron saint of France. He furthered monasticism in Gaul. Feast day: Nov 11 or 12
9. (Biography) Steve(n). born 1945, US film actor and comedian; his films include The Jerk (1979), Roxanne (1987), and Bowfinger) (1999)

mar•tin

(ˈmɑr tn)

n.
any of various swallows having a wedge-shaped or notched tail.
[1425–75; presumably generic use of the personal name traditionally by association with March (Latin Mārtius), when the bird arrives, and Martinmas, when it leaves]

Mar•tin

(ˈmɑr tn)

n.
1. Archer John Porter, born 1910, English biochemist: Nobel prize 1952..
2. Homer Dodge, 1836–97, U.S. painter.
3. Saint, A.D. 316?–397, French prelate: bishop of Tours 370?–397.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.martin - French bishop who is a patron saint of France (died in 397)Martin - French bishop who is a patron saint of France (died in 397)
2.Martin - United States actor and comedian (born in 1945)
3.martin - United States actress (1913-1990)Martin - United States actress (1913-1990)  
4.Martin - United States singer (1917-1995)
5.martin - any of various swallows with squarish or slightly forked tail and long pointed wingsmartin - any of various swallows with squarish or slightly forked tail and long pointed wings; migrate around Martinmas
swallow - small long-winged songbird noted for swift graceful flight and the regularity of its migrations
Delichon urbica, house martin - common small European martin that builds nests under the eaves of houses
bank martin, bank swallow, Riparia riparia, sand martin - swallow of the northern hemisphere that nests in tunnels dug in clay or sand banks
Progne subis, purple martin - large North American martin of which the male is blue-black
Translations
Martin
MartinMorten
MartinSchwalbe
Martti
Marteinn
Martinus
MartinMorten
Marcin
MårtenMartin

Martin

[ˈmɑːtɪn] NMartín

martin

[ˈmɑːtɪn] Navión m, vencejo m

martin

[ˈmɑːrtɪn] n (also house martin) → martinet m

martin

nSchwalbe f

martin

[ˈmɑːtɪn] n (bird) (also house martin) → balestruccio
sand martin → topino
References in classic literature ?
Once upon a time there lived an old couple who had one son called Martin.
Leave off beating him,' said Martin, 'and sell him to me instead.
Ma," she shouted suddenly, in her shrill, strident treble, "I see Martin comin'.
It won't set any better after old Brindle fills up on this dust," observed Martin, belligerency in his brassy voice.
The effect that Keggs, the butler at the Keiths', had on Martin Rossiter was to make him feel as if he had been caught laughing in a cathedral.
When they were not shooting they congregated in the billiard-room and devoted their powerful intellects exclusively to snooker-pool, leaving Martin free to talk undisturbed to Elsa.
And away went the two, and we all stayed and had a regular turn-out of the den, till Martin came back with his hand bandaged and turned us out.
If we knew how to use our boys, Martin would have been seized upon and educated as a natural philosopher.
Once or twice in the month, while riding through the park on his way to the library, Martin dismounted from his wheel and listened to the arguments, and each time he tore himself away reluctantly.
Martin was puzzled as to what the discussion was about, but when he rode on to the library he carried with him a new-born interest in Herbert Spencer, and because of the frequency with which the tramp had mentioned "First Principles," Martin drew out that volume.
Martin, who bore a part in the narrative, and was always mentioned with approbation for his great goodnature in doing something or other, was a single man; that there was no young Mrs.
Martin had told her one day (and there was a blush as she said it,) that it was impossible for any body to be a better son, and therefore she was sure, whenever he married, he would make a good husband.