masculinist

(redirected from Masculist)
Related to Masculist: Masculinist

masculinist

(ˈmæskjʊlɪnɪst) or

masculist

n
an advocate of the rights of men
adj
of, characterized by, or relating to men's rights
Translations

masculinist

[ˈmæskjʊlɪnɪst] ADJmasculino

masculinist

adjmaskulinistisch
References in periodicals archive ?
One pioneering woman's breakthrough is rarely anywhere near enough to change a masculist systemic culture.
Rare exceptions to this include Nyairo and Ogude's (2005) discussion of how a Kenyan hip-hop track became 'official state culture' after its use in the 2002 presidential campaign and Evan Mwangi's (2004) analysis of the ways in which masculist tropes in East African hip-hop texts borrow from the discourses of nation building.
One of these four masculist fanatics somehow got hold of the microphone, and he began shouting, "Away with all men wim's finery and decorations
Not only does Huber seek to re-interpret the tale as a means of deflating masculist ideologies about women's patterns of development, but she also sees in the story of Psyche's transformation a holistic and gender-neutral "approach to theorizing knowledge" (p.
Women's studies, of course, grew out of such multi-disciplinarity, as it requires the flexibility to locate women's experiences beyond the artificial and rigid barriers of our masculist intellectual structures.
In brief, these include: (1) an indeterminate beginning and open ending; (2) an awareness of a threshold, crossed on the basis of a "call"; (3) a severing of connections and a re-connection; (4) the use of digressions and various other devices which destroy ordinary sequencing; (5) the awareness of the "gaps in life" caused by the irony and paradox of living within a masculist culture; (6) the centralizing of human relationships; (7) an awareness of the changing nature of relationships; (8) the accumulation of sensory detail in telling the story; and (9) the expression of the spiritual aspects of the journey outside of cultural context (pp.
As Sedgwick argues, feminist critics had similarly constructed gendered readings of the canon of mastery, even when gender was not a central consideration: "It is through this mechanism [gendered reading] that feminism has had so magnetic an effect on the very insides as well as on the surround of the male and masculist canon" ("Pedagogy" 141).
But it less does that than the reverse: the masculist attitudes in evidence seem very familiar from British history; and their application in colonial practice - while revealing some nice contradictions - appears no more than an adaptation to the well-known racial idiosyncracies of Indian colonialism.
The question is how to confront the real biases affecting men without lapsing into the whining and gender warfare that permeate modern feminism--and also show up in some masculist publications, where men said to be unjustly convicted of sexual assault are described as "political prisoners" and the status of American males under feminist rule is compared to that of Jews in Nazi Germany.
If masculists often seem oblivious to this historical male advantage, it is in part because participation in the human enterprise no longer ranks high on the feminist agenda.
On a less innocent note, Christian Garaud shows how Dominique Aury re-writes masculist pornotopia from the women's point of view in The Story of O to achieve the "pornomythique.