Masorah


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Ma·so·ra

also Ma·so·rah  (mə-sôr′ə)
n.
1. The body of Judaic tradition relating to correct textual reading of the Hebrew scriptures.
2. The critical notes made on manuscripts of the Hebrew scriptures before the tenth century, which embody this tradition.

[Hebrew māsôrâ, from māsar, to hand over; see msr in Semitic roots.]

Mas′o·ret′ic (măs′ə-rĕt′ĭk) adj.

Ma•so•rah

or Ma•so•ra

(məˈsɔr ə, -ˈsoʊr ə)

n.
a body of scribal notes that form a textual guide to the Hebrew Old Testament, compiled from the 7th to 10th centuries A.D.
[< Hebrew māsōrāh]
Mas•o•ret•ic (ˌmæs əˈrɛt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Masorah - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of textsMasorah - a vast body of textual criticism of the Hebrew Scriptures including notes on features of writing and on the occurrence of certain words and on variant sources and instructions for pronunciation and other comments that were written between AD 600 and 900 by Jewish scribes in the margins or at the end of texts
textual criticism - comparison of a particular text with related materials in order to establish authenticity
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the Masorah notes that the description that Ezra during mourning "did not eat bread" (Ezra 10:6) is a phrase referring only to Moses elsewhere in Scripture.
However, when tracing the transmission of the Masorah (chain of tradition), Maimonides (Rambam) mentions the rabbinical court of Ezra, known as the "Men of the Great Assembly", (4) and notes that the last of these sages was Simeon the Just, whom he describes as the high priest some time after Ezra.
13) The Masorah is a collection of critical and explanatory notes on the Hebrew text of the Old Testament from about the 7th-11th centuries AD, traditionally accepted as an authoritative exegetic guide, chiefly in matters of pronunciation and grammar.
Talmud Yerushalmi-Seder Zera'im, Brooklyn (NY): Artskrol Masorah.
Saadia Gaon, the Spanish linguists and the Ba'alei Masorah in chronological order, with forthcoming volumes to represent others.
Among their topics are reflections on the text of the Book of Job, some difficulties encountered by ancient translators, a comparative study of the Masorah Magna and Parva of the Book of Deuteronomy as attested in the Leningrad and Madrid M1 manuscripts, and lexical ignorance and the ancient versions of Proverbs.