mass extinction


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mass extinction

n.
The extinction of a large number of species within a relatively short period of time, as between the Cretaceous and Tertiary Periods when three-quarters of all species on earth, including most dinosaurs, became extinct.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's well accepted that we're in the midst of Earth's sixth mass extinction of plants and animals.
It seems highly unlikely dinosaurs ever used the phrase "wrong place, wrong time" but if they could have used it, that is how they might have described the mass extinction event that wiped out all their non-avian varieties.
Exceeding this threshold will lead to the sixth mass extinction of species on Earth, LIFE said, quoted by BTA.
News of a sixth mass extinction makes for frightening reading.
The availability of such broad literature dealing with different episodes of mass extinction supports its importance and interest among the paleontologists and other geoscientists.
Geoscientist Jonathan Payne of Stanford University, the study's lead author, has termed it surprising there was no similar kind of pattern in any of the previous mass extinction events examined.
ISLAMABAD -- The world is embarking on its sixth mass extinction with animals disappearing about 100 times faster than they used to, scientists warned on Friday, and humans could be among the first victims.
The amount of carbon added to the atmosphere that triggered the mass extinction was probably greater than today's fossil fuel reserves, according to the study coordinated by the University of Edinburgh.
We're seeing right now that a mass extinction can be caused by human beings," says Walter Alvarez, a scientist at the University of California, Berkeley.
This is the only record of the conodont fauna during the mass extinction in South China.
By focusing on how researchers have pieced together these ancient whodunits, Mass Extinction offers great insight into how science works.
Washington, Apr 24 ( ANI ): A new study on prehistoric big cats suggests that finicky eaters usually do not survive mass extinction events.