picketing

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Related to Mass picketing: Secondary picketing

pick·et

 (pĭk′ĭt)
n.
1. A pointed stake often driven into the ground to support a fence, secure a tent, tether animals, mark points in surveying, or, when pointed at the top, serve as a defense.
2. A detachment of one or more troops, ships, or aircraft held in readiness or advanced to warn of an enemy's approach: "The outlying sonar picket ... was to detect, localize, and engage any submarine trying to close the convoy" (Tom Clancy).
3.
a. A person or group of persons stationed outside a place of employment, usually during a strike, to express grievance or protest and discourage entry by nonstriking employees or customers.
b. A person or group of persons present outside a building to protest.
v. pick·et·ed, pick·et·ing, pick·ets
v.tr.
1. To enclose, secure, tether, mark out, or fortify with pickets.
2.
a. To post as a picket.
b. To guard with a picket.
3. To post a picket or pickets during a strike or demonstration.
v.intr.
To act or serve as a picket.

[French piquet, from Old French, from piquer, to prick; see pique.]

pick′et·er n.

picketing

(ˈpɪkɪtɪŋ)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the act of serving as pickets at (a factory, embassy, etc)
Translations

picketing

[ˈpɪkɪtɪŋ] Nformación f de piquetes

picketing

[ˈpɪkɪtɪŋ] npiquets mpl de grèvepicket line npiquet m de grève

picketing

nAufstellen ntvon Streikposten; there was no picketinges wurden keine Streikposten aufgestellt; the picketing of the factory went on for six monthses standen sechs Monate lang Streikposten vor dem Betrieb
References in periodicals archive ?
In what became known as the Battle of Orgreave, 6,000 police officers from around the country were deployed at the plant on June 18, 1984 to deal with mass picketing by striking miners hoping to prevent the movement of coke stocks.
The unions combined militant mass picketing, mass meetings and selected demonstration targets along with internal and public education.
For someone who witnessed the bitterness of the miners' strike and the mass picketing that took place at the 'Battle of Salford Gate', in 1972 it is hard to believe that this is the same area.
But, five years later at the end of a decade which had seen three-day weeks, power cuts, mass picketing and closed shops, a new political force, in the shape of Margaret Thatcher, was swept into power.
Mass picketing was outlawed, ballots had to be held before industrial action could be taken, secondary action was made illegal and union leaders had to face regular elections to keep their jobs.
Job losses and pit closures sparked the dispute, but National Union of Miners (NUM) leader Arthur Scargill decided not to hold a national ballot and the year was dominated by mass picketing, violent scenes at pits across the country and clashes with miners who refused to join the strike.
As soon as mass picketing was prevented by the ensuing injunction, hundreds of employees began returning to their jobs.
The combined pressures of media coverage, mass picketing, the Minister of Labour, and Metro Council finally forced Artistic to cave on several key bargaining issues.
Frank Mamat is one of the nation's preeminent labor law attorneys, and focuses his practices on complex labor issues, with a special focus on union matters, contract negotiations, unfair labor practice litigation, NLRB practice, organizing attempts by unions, mass picketing and violence, secondary boycotts and pressure, and Federal and State OSHA practice.
I first met Jack Dromey when he was a skilful union fixer during the bitter Grunwick dispute of the 1970s - a strike at a photo processing firm in North London which escalated into mass picketing and bloodshed - and he looked like a man going places.
A UNION leader has warned of mass picketing against any employment agency which supplies temporary workers to Asda in the event of a strike by its employees.