mass production

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Related to Mass produced: Series production, Serial production

mass production

n.
The manufacture of goods in large quantities, often using standardized designs and assembly-line techniques.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mass production - the production of large quantities of a standardized article (often using assembly line techniques)mass production - the production of large quantities of a standardized article (often using assembly line techniques)
production - (economics) manufacturing or mining or growing something (usually in large quantities) for sale; "he introduced more efficient methods of production"
Translations

mass production

nproduzione f in serie
References in periodicals archive ?
The research was carried out at laboratorial scale, and nanostructures were synthesized through a simple and economic method with the ability to be mass produced.
Davies, who also stars on the QI quiz show, added: "I get why people get hooked on [soaps] but like anything mass produced, you're not going to get as nice a meal in a fast food place as when a chef has time to prepare it properly.
The Rotamat is said to be the ideal overall solution for surface coating of small mass produced parts.
The site was set up to help designers, artists and makers to promote and grow their small business and to find a place in a market that is overflowing with mass produced imports," said a spokeswoman.
As part of Iran's annual revolution celebrations, a time traditionally marked by new technological and military advances, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad unveiled four locally-made satellites while a senior commander showed off mass produced missiles.
The manufacturing of the cane is not limited to individual carpenters who make a small number of handmade ones as now they are mass produced in factories using a variety of different materials.
Industrialization also developed the means for mass-produced clocks, the subject of the "Early Mass Produced Timepieces: 1806-1860" exhibit running through March 29 at the Willard House and Clock Museum in North Grafton.