dialectical materialism

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Related to Materialist dialectics: dialectical materialism

dialectical materialism

n.
The Marxian interpretation of reality that views matter as the sole subject of change and all change as the product of a constant conflict between opposites arising from the internal contradictions inherent in all events, ideas, and movements.

dialectical materialism

n
1. (Philosophy) the economic, political, and philosophical system of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels that combines traditional materialism and Hegelian dialectic
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the economic, political, and philosophical system of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels that combines traditional materialism and Hegelian dialectic
3. (Economics) the economic, political, and philosophical system of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels that combines traditional materialism and Hegelian dialectic
dialectical materialist n

dialec′tical mate′rialism


n.
the Marxian system of thought that combines philosophical materialism with the Hegelian dialectic and forms the theoretical basis for Communism.
[1925–30]

dialectical materialism

the combination of traditional materialism and Hegelian dialectic as espoused in the economic and political philosophies of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. — dialectical materialist.
See also: Communism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dialectical materialism - the materialistic philosophy of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
physicalism, materialism - (philosophy) the philosophical theory that matter is the only reality
Translations
materialismo dialettico
References in periodicals archive ?
Zizek calls this materialist dialectics because the subject and object subiate to form the Hegelian spirit, in the form of truth.
The materialist dialectics of Marx--"bullshit" (according the analytical Marxists with whom Brenner associated) --are replaced by the syllogistic and deductive logic of capitalist social relations in markets presumed rational.
We can see, here, some ideas of interest to Badiou: incompleteness, openness, infinity, non-totalization, a "non-materialist" kind of materialist dialectics.
Growing out of the work of these early critical intellectuals, a more developed, non-teleological science grounded in materialist dialectics came to the fore in the 1960s and 1970s with the work of Marxist-influenced scientists--particularly Richard Lewontin, Richard Levins, and Stephen Jay Gould at Harvard, then the leading center of evolutionary biology.