Matilda


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Ma·til·da 1

 (mə-tĭl′də) Known as "Empress Maud." 1102-1167.
English princess as the daughter of Henry I. After her first husband, Emperor Henry V, died, she married Geoffrey, Count of Anjou (died 1151), in 1128 and bore the future Henry II. She struggled with her cousin Stephen of Blois for the throne of England and governed briefly in 1141 until defeated later that year.

Ma·til·da 2

 (mə-tĭl′də)
n. Australian
The pack or bundle containing the personal belongings of a swagman; a swag.

[From the name Matilda.]

Matilda

(məˈtɪldə)
n
1. a bushman's swag
2. waltz Matilda walk Matilda to travel the road carrying one's swag
[C20: from the Christian name]

Matilda

(məˈtɪldə)
n
(Biography) known as the Empress Maud. 1102–67, only daughter of Henry I of England and wife of Geoffrey of Anjou. After her father's death (1135) she unsuccessfully waged a civil war with Stephen for the English throne; her son succeeded as Henry II
Translations
Matylda
Mathilde
Mathilde
Matilda
Mathilde
Matilde
Mathilde
Matilda

Matilda

[məˈtɪldə] NMatilde
References in classic literature ?
Miss Matilda, a strapping hoyden of about fourteen, with a short frock and trousers, shrugged her shoulders and made a slight grimace, but took a candle and proceeded before me up the back stairs (a long, steep, double flight), and through a long, narrow passage, to a small but tolerably comfortable room.
Miss Matilda Murray was a veritable hoyden, of whom little need be said.
As an animal, Matilda was all right, full of life, vigour, and activity; as an intelligent being, she was barbarously ignorant, indocile, careless and irrational; and, consequently, very distressing to one who had the task of cultivating her understanding, reforming her manners, and aiding her to acquire those ornamental attainments which, unlike her sister, she despised as much as the rest.
As a moral agent, Matilda was reckless, headstrong, violent, and unamenable to reason.
And now, on the top of all this, comes word that my sister Matilda has broken her leg and wants me to go and stay with her for a spell.
As for Matilda, I do not know what to think of her.
I'm sorry for Matilda Clow, but since she had to break her leg it couldn't have happened at a better time.
Yes, yes, I see you are the Daughter of my Laurina's eldest Girl; your resemblance to the beauteous Matilda sufficiently proclaims it.
Thou -- whomsoever thou mayst be, into whose hands these memoirs of the wretched Matilda may fall' -- when your lamp suddenly expires in the socket, and leaves you in total darkness.
The Harding family consisted of Robert Harding, his wife Matilda, Miss Julia Went, who was her sister, and two young children.
And it's to this man's son--this scoundrel, gambler, swindler, murderer of a Rawdon Crawley, that Matilda leaves the bulk of her money.
As another instance of these bitter fruits of conquest, and perhaps the strongest that can be quoted, we may mention, that the Princess Matilda, though a daughter of the King of Scotland, and afterwards both Queen of England, niece to Edgar Atheling, and mother to the Empress of Germany, the daughter, the wife, and the mother of monarchs, was obliged, during her early residence for education in England, to assume the veil of a nun, as the only means of escaping the licentious pursuit of the Norman nobles.