matsuri


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matsuri

(mætˈsʊərɪ)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a Shinto ceremony taking place at a shrine
References in periodicals archive ?
They are commonly displayed in homes during the Hina Matsuri celebration.
The passion between the characters has not dwindled, and neither have manga-ka Matsuri Hino's drawing skills.
More than 150 cars will be on track for two days of sideways action, making the Drift Matsuri the biggest Drift event in the UK.
The Hadaka Matsuri, also known as the Naked Man festival is still carried out in some Japanese villages where one man or "Shin-Otoko" is chosen to absolve the miseries and misfortunes of the entire village, according to (http://www.
According to labour standards inspectors's conclusion, drawn in September 2016, sparked debate on the harsh working conditions in the country led to the suicide of 24-year-old Dentsu employee Matsuri Takahashi in April 2015.
Matsuri Takahashi, 24, claimed to be so busy she slept just 10 hours a week and worked more than 100 hours of overtime a month.
Matsuri Takahashi worked for Japan's biggest advertising agency, Dentsu, for nearly a year when she committed suicide at the end of 2015.
Held throughout Shikoku are such traditional events as the Yosakoi Matsuri Festival in Kochi City.
According to the Grand Dictionary of Japanese Folklore (Nihon Minzoku Dajiten), a matsuri represents the time when the divine spirits are welcome among mortals, "receiving offerings and being properly entertained with artistic performances and feasts, so that they would be pacified" (Fukuta et al 2000: 577) According to the textbook recommended by the Association of Shinto Shrines (Jinja Honcho), matsuri are inextricably connected to Shinto shrines, and they can be divided into events related to specific moments in the life of an individual, and annual events, most of which are tied to agriculture and fertility rituals (Nihon no Matsuri 2014).
This will be celebrated in Bacolod City between July and August to coincide with the Obon Matsuri (Japanese Lantern
April 5 Japan Kanamara Matsuri, Kawasaki It called the festival of the Iron Phallus, but it is truly surreal and liberating, even if some might snigger, to watch the Japanese celebrate fertility, marriage and birth with such class.