Maunder minimum


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Maunder minimum

n.
A period of unusually low sunspot activity lasting from approximately 1645 to 1715, corresponding roughly to the middle and coldest portion of the Little Ice Age.

[After Edward Walter Maunder (1851-1928), British astronomer who identified it in records of sunspot activity from the time.]
Translations
Maunderminimum
References in periodicals archive ?
asks Willie Soon, author of The Maunder Minimum, which concerns the effect of solar cycles on climate.
London, Jan 19 ( ANI ): Scientists have warned that the recent lack of activity in sun could lead to a new mini ice age, just like 17th century's Maunder Minimum, in European countries.
That would be good news for anyone worried about whether the sun is about to sink into another Maunder minimum, that 17th century slump that coincided with the Little Ice Age.
Not to forget the Maunder Minimum AD 1645-1715 which produced the Little Ice Age, and the Solar Storm of AD 1859.
The research speculated that the dip could see Brits face temperatures similar to those experienced during the Maunder minimum.
The Maunder Minimum is considered to extend between 1645 and 1715.
There was a period from 1645 to 1715 when the sun showed similar lack of sunspots, this was the Maunder minimum when trees stopped growing and the River Thames froze.
History shows, for example, that very few sunspots were observed from 1650 to 1700, a period known as the Maunder Minimum when Europe endured particularly bitter winters.
Next to this we plot the lowest sunspot activity, a period known as the Maunder Minimum where there were no sunspots for five decades, and then the solar activity that occurred at the end of the 1900s, estimated to be the highest in the last 11,000 years.
Sceptics have drawn this conclusion because scientists have discovered a correlation between a period of low solar activity known as the Maunder Minimum (from the late-seventeenth into the eighteenth century) and low sunspot activity.
During the 17th century, which was an unusually cold period on Earth, the sun had very little magnetic activity for about a century - the Maunder Minimum, coincident with the Little Ice Age.
Between 1645 and 1715 almost no sunspots were observed, a solar period which came to be called the Maunder Minimum.