Mc Job

McJob

(məkˈdʒɒb)
n.
an unstimulating, low-wage job with few benefits, esp. in a service industry.
[1991, Amer.; coined by Douglas Coupland (b. 1961) in the novel Generation X]
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The facilities include Waterside Brasserie - a fully functional commercial restaurant - MC Travel, MC Job Shop, three beauty salons, a spa suite, a nail bar, a health and fitness suite, a 156-seat theatre, all-weather sports pitch, recording studios, dance and drama studios, a 98-seat demonstration theatre and an 86-seat lecture theatre.
For the college's dedicated facility - MC Job Shop - not only advertises vacancies for students, but provides help and support to jobseekers and has had enormous success matching applicants with suitable positions.
I would also like to take this opportunity to thank those who worked with us to promote this opportunity, not least Middlesbrough Council and Jobcentre Plus" MC Job Shop staff also excel at helping students improve their job-seeking skills including completing applications and sharpening their interview skills.
And it's not only jobs that MC Job Shop can help with.
MC Job Shop also supports those thinking of enrolling in a particular course but who are unsure whether it will help them achieve their career goals.
More information about MC Job Shop can be found at http://mbrojobshop.
A gritty masterpiece containing tales of escapism, urban decay, and an overwhelming urge to reject the Mc Job prospects of many of today's kids.
Since attending this seminar, nobody works in an Mc Job for a large conglomerate, nine to five - they keep the lights on, they help people harness the powers of their minds, they turn dreams into reality, they change children's lives, they sell anvils.
After a nod towards "achievements of the past" (the wording is significant), like public health care and pensions, they warned European workers that they risked losing out in the new global economy unless they accepted more workplace "flexibility" (read: Mc Jobs, layoffs, lower pay, longer shifts) and the "modernization" (read: abolition) of their social benefits.