McMansion

(redirected from McMansions)
Also found in: Financial.

Mc·Man·sion

 (mĭk-măn′shən)
n.
A large new house, usually constructed as part of a suburban development and characterized by ostentation rather than quality of workmanship or architectural distinction.

[Mc(Donald's), trademark of a fast-food restaurant chain (from its mass-produced nature) + mansion.]

McMansion

(məkˈmænʃən)
n
(Architecture) informal derogatory a large modern house considered to look mass-produced, lacking in distinguishing characteristics, and at variance with established local architecture
[C20: a corruption of McDonald's, a major American fast-food enterprise noted for the ubiquity of its restaurants]
References in periodicals archive ?
Brian McDermott: "These likely won't be affordable homes, but cookie cutter McMansions targeted to (cough-cough) Californians.
It spans a landscape that stretches from the upper-middle class to the destitute, from Skid Row tents and Beverlywood McMansions to desiccated cabins in the high desert's dystopian Wonder Valley.
Millennials--who are largely expected to be the buyers of boomers' homes--have differing tastes, with more opting to live in central cities or in the oldest, closest suburbs, or they're showing preferences for smaller homes and not sprawling McMansions in the exurbs.
McMansions have flourished in suburbs across the country, and as houses got bigger we filled them with more stuff.
com users will now have the ability to browse thousands of the Cape and Islands' famous rentals, ranging from Victorian-style summer cottages and Nineteenth Century “Gingerbread homes” to stunning beachfront McMansions.
Few want to live in a no man's land 40 minutes by bus from the city centre, an unloved, invisible of executive Mcmansions, roundabouts and superstores, sagging lintels and dripping gutters.
Get this: Americans are getting sick of McMansions.
Maybe the return of McMansions shouldn't be such a surprise.
From the appearance of giant malls, theme parks and McMansions to its incorporation of past politics with present changes, THE CONCRETE DRAGON offers thought-provoking surveys of changing communities across China, pairing study with the author's observations and the experiences of Chinese architects and developers.
a San Joaquin Valley city crushed by single-family home foreclosures, college students are opting to rent depreciating McMansions rather than small dormitory rooms.
Fueled by subsidies and easy credit, with mortgages guaranteed by taxpayers, we built McMansions and vacation condos on the assumption that prices would never fall.