Medicaid


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Related to Medicaid: Medicare

Med·i·caid

also med·i·caid  (mĕd′ĭ-kād′)
n.
A program in the United States, jointly funded by the states and the federal government, that reimburses hospitals and physicians for providing care to qualifying people who cannot finance their own medical expenses.

Medicaid

(ˈmɛdɪˌkeɪd)
n
(Social Welfare) US a health assistance programme financed by federal, state, and local taxes to help pay hospital and medical costs for persons of low income
[C20: medic(al) + aid]

Med•i•caid

(ˈmɛd ɪˌkeɪd)

n.
(sometimes l.c.) a federal and state program of medical insurance for persons with very low incomes.
(medic (al) + aid]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Medicaid - health care for the needyMedicaid - health care for the needy; a federally and state-funded program
health care - social insurance for the ill and injured
Translations

Medicaid

[ˈmɛdikeɪd] n (US)couverture maladie universelle

Med·i·caid

n. Asistencia Médica, programa del gobierno de los Estados Unidos que provee asistencia médica a los pobres.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Maine HMP, Vermont's PDP was a [section]115 waiver to provide certain Medicaid prescription drug benefits to individuals not previously eligible for Medicaid.
Consider this: 90 percent of all long-term health care services are paid for by the government - they are paid for by Social Security, Medicare and predominantly Medicaid.
Clay Farris moderated the pre-conference Medicaid 101 workshop for about 100 attendees.
According to an analysis by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC), fewer physicians are accepting Medicaid patients because of relatively low payment rates and high administrative costs, particularly for doctors working individually or in small group practices.
To explore whether clinicians who provide reproductive health care to young female patients should screen them for abuse and exposure to violence, the researcher conducted a cross-sectional analysis of several Alaskan databases: a data file of all females who were enrolled in Medicaid at any point in 1999-2003 and who were 10-15 years old on December 31 of any study year; a database of all females in that age-group who were referred to the state's child protective services unit for investigation of physical or sexual abuse by a primary caregiver in 1999-2003; a similar database for referrals to the state's juvenile justice system; and a database of births to Alaskan residents.
Federal officials recently indicated Medicaid spending nationwide has dropped this year for the first time since the program was created, USA Today reported Sunday, citing federal Bureau of Economic Analysis figures.
Long-term care providers and others, especially those that receive $5 million or more in Medicaid reimbursement annually, need to educate themselves on the DRA's Medicaid fraud provisions.
Consider that Medicaid pays for almost half the nursing-home care in America, while Medicare picks up an additional 11.
states have started paying for emergency coverage (often through people's Medicaid cards--often called Medical Assistance), hopefully until the federal system gets straightened out.
Several state legislatures, including that of Mississippi, enacted a tax specifically upon health care providers designed to increase the states' share of the federal matching Medicaid reimbursement dollars--annually adjusted "match" for poor states that often has exceeded 80%.
The Miller trusts, allowed under federal law only in states with no medically needy programs, enabled residents to remain Medicaid eligible.
For fiscal 2003, which in most states ended June 30, Medicaid spending went up just 9.