confidentiality

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Related to Medical privacy: Medical Confidentiality

con·fi·den·tial

 (kŏn′fĭ-dĕn′shəl)
adj.
1. Done or communicated in confidence; secret.
2. Entrusted with the confidence of another: a confidential secretary.
3. Denoting confidence or intimacy: a confidential tone of voice.
4. Containing information, the unauthorized disclosure of which poses a threat to national security.

con′fi·den′ti·al′i·ty (-shē-ăl′ĭ-tē), con′fi·den′tial·ness n.
con′fi·den′tial·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.confidentiality - the state of being secret; "you must respect the confidentiality of your client's communications"
concealment, privateness, secrecy, privacy - the condition of being concealed or hidden
2.confidentiality - discretion in keeping secret information
circumspection, discreetness, discretion, prudence - knowing how to avoid embarrassment or distress; "the servants showed great tact and discretion"
Translations
ثِقَه، سِرِّيّه، ائتِمان
důvěrnosttajnost
fortrolighed
trúnaîur
gizlilik

confidentiality

[ˌkɒnfɪˌdenʃɪˈælɪtɪ] Nconfidencialidad f

confidentiality

[ˌkɒnfɪdɛnʃiˈælɪti] n [information, report, document] → confidentialité f

confidentiality

confidentiality

[ˌkɒnfɪˌdɛnʃɪˈælɪtɪ] nriservatezza, carattere m confidenziale

confide

(kənˈfaid) verb
to tell one's private thoughts to someone. He confided in his brother; He confided his fears to his brother.
confidence (ˈkonfidəns) noun
1. trust or belief in someone's ability. I have great confidence in you.
2. belief and faith in one's own ability. She shows a great deal of confidence for her age.
confident (ˈkonfidənt) adjective
having a great deal of trust (especially in oneself). She is confident that she will win; a confident boy.
confidential (konfiˈdenʃəl) adjective
1. secret; not to be told to others. confidential information.
2. trusted to keep secrets. a confidential secretary.
confidentiality (ˈkonfidenʃiˈӕləti) noun
ˌconfiˈdentially adverb
secretly; not wishing to have the information passed on to anyone else. She could not tell me what he said – he was speaking confidentially.
conˈfiding adjective
trustful.
conˈfidingly adverb
in confidence
as a secret; confidentially. He told me the story in (strictest) confidence.

con·fi·den·ti·al·i·ty

n. confidencialidad.

confidentiality

n intimidad f, confidencialidad f patient — intimidad or confidencialidad del paciente
References in periodicals archive ?
Colomb has recently said that there should be a mobilisation of psychiatric services to monitor those people with mental health issues, all the while respecting medical privacy.
Rather, it creates a threat to medical privacy that ought to be carefully thought through.
And while the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission permits an employer's legitimate inquiry into and reporting of communicable illness, in the unlikely event of actual Ebola diagnosis, any sick employee's medical privacy must still be safeguarded.
Steward had claimed Globe reporter Jenna Russell's series was written using incomplete medical records, and that the health care organization was prohibited by medical privacy laws from responding to what it claimed were untrue allegations relating to Bourne's care.
Laura Coverson, a spokeswoman for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said she could not confirm reports that Knight was being treated there due to strict medical privacy laws.
This would appear to obviate both the need for any documents from the hospital resolving defendant's medical privacy concerns - and the need to rely upon a third party government agency like Customs and Border Protection", the order states.
The text begins with a discussion of the meaning of privacy and the value of information, then offers chapters on consumer privacy in areas such as e-commerce, social media, the workplace, health and medical privacy, and children's privacy online.
Due to the interaction of HIPAA (the Federal medical privacy law), CLIA (a Federal laboratory regulatory law), and state laws, patients can only get direct access to their their test results from labs in a handful of states.
Along with the power grab, ObamaCare has been an assault on religious liberty and medical privacy, while tracking gun ownership in medical databases.
Tressa Miller did not release the victim's name, citing medical privacy laws.
Overall, the position paper lays out a framework for protecting medical privacy while sharing information that's important for clinical care.

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