Medieval Latin


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Medieval Latin

n.
The Latin language as used from about 700 to about 1500.

Medieval Latin

n
(Languages) the Latin language as used throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. It had many local forms incorporating Latinized words from other languages

Me′die′val Lat′in


n.
the Latin language as used in the Middle Ages, from c700 to c1500. Abbr.: ML
[1880–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Medieval Latin - Latin used for liturgical purposes during the Middle AgesMedieval Latin - Latin used for liturgical purposes during the Middle Ages
Low Latin - any dialect of Latin other than the classical
Translations
latin médiéval
middelalderlatin
References in periodicals archive ?
Alhazen (or Alhacen) (965-1039 AD) translated and adapted Ibn al-Haytham's Kitab al-Manazir into a medieval Latin treatise on light and sight.
But the article by Michel Lemoine on neologisms in Calcidius's commentary on and translation of the Timaeus, and Jacques Paviot's discussion of seafaring terms current in Medieval Latin before the fourteenth century, though both fine lexicographical studies, would seem to be less directly connected with the early modern era.
Paul Botley's Latin Translation in the Renaissance is a work of positivistic scholarship in which primary and secondary sources, including manuscripts and early printed books, are examined with meticulous care; readers come away with a wealth of detailed information about how Latin translators in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries acquired texts and regarded their Greek, medieval Latin, and contemporary sources.
The twelve papers included in this volume are mostly concerned with German literature, but there are also contributions from the fields of medieval Latin, history and art history.
Despite these shortcomings, this book can provide a useful introduction to the intellectual life of the medieval Latin West.
Apollonius of Tyre Chief personage in a medieval Latin romance of unknown authorship, which may be assumed to derive from a lost Greek original.
A clue as to why fables are excluded from the author's canon of medieval Latin beast poetry (and yet turn up all over the place) may be found in the titles chosen for Chapter 2, `Beast Narrative and the Court of Charlemagne', Chapter 3, `Further /?
One would think that this difficulty would be alleviated in the Latin tradition, but then one notes that in some of the Latin manuscripts roman numerals were used to designate those same numbers, and that numbers such as i=10 and 1=50 are equally confused in medieval Latin script.
Classicists and medievalists explore the dynamic interplay between medieval Latin and various vernacular languages during the Renaissance.
A wonderful array of topics is covered, ranging from the role of languages and code-switching in texts produced in King Alfred's court, Abbo of Fleury's stay in Ramsey (985-87), and the interactions between Old English, Medieval Latin, Old Gallo-Romance, and Greek, to an investigation of the Roman language in twelfth-century English historiography.
The topics include Greek dictionaries ancient and modern, the single-author lexicon, myths and markets of Liddell and Scott, the Cambridge Greek Lexicon's approach to learners' lexica, and the making of the Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources.
They were not content with medieval Latin translations of Galen but used their knowledge of Greek to produce better Latin translations.