Meech Lake Accord


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Meech Lake Accord

(miːtʃ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the agreement reached in 1987 at Meech Lake, Quebec, at a Canadian federal-provincial conference that accepted Quebec's conditions for signing the Constitution Act of 1982. The Accord lapsed when the legislatures of two provinces, Newfoundland and Quebec, failed to ratify it by the deadline of June 23, 1990
References in periodicals archive ?
David Lewis was not the leader of the NDP in 1966, the revolt against the Official Languages Act in Robert Stanfield's caucus was in 1969, not 1972, the Liberals won only two seats west of Ontario in 1980, not two seats west of Manitoba, and the Meech Lake Accord would not have given the provinces a veto over all kinds of constitutional amendments.
Hampton's work looks more broadly and combines oral and textual evidence to analyze the interplay between citizenship, feminism, and opposition to the Meech Lake Accord in New Brunswick.
Simeon's comments on "public engagement" and his role in the Meech Lake Accord remind readers that the scholar can be an activist as well.
Chapter 6, for example, draws from scholarship on the Charter, Meech Lake Accord, language legislation, linguistic vitality, demography, and institutional completeness, in addition to citing major legal decisions such as Mercure and Mahe.
The three years between the signing of the Meech Lake Accord and its demise were a momentous time for Canada, arguably involving the development of fault lines that split Canada and led to a gradual reconfiguration of our land.
IB: Our job was to sit through the hearings, which went on seven weeks, (41) to distill all of the arguments for and against the provisions of the Meech Lake Accord and to offer advice to the Parliamentary Committee as to whether the criticisms were justified or not.
Wells is known for his opposition to the 1987 Meech Lake Accord, designed to bring Quebec into the constitutional fold by granting it special status within Confederation.
When he stopped the Meech Lake Accord in its tracks he showed Canada the power of the right-minded citizen in doing so, he raised the profile of Native people across the country and showed our neighbors how politically savvy, astute and powerful we are.
Pawley provides first-hand, unvarnished accounts of such key episodes as the introduction of public automobile insurance, the Manitoba French-language/bell-ringing crisis of 1984, the Meech Lake Accord, the fall of his government in 1988 at the hands of disgruntled NDP MLA Jim Walding and the CF-18 fiasco (which he recounts as nothing short of perfidious on Brian Mulroney's part).
The Meech Lake Accord, which was being considered at the same time as the Official Languages Act, had some effect on the language in that legislation.
One of the iconic images of the national debate on the Meech Lake Accord, and its eventual defeat, is that of Manitoba MLA Elijah Harper, a member of the Red Sucker Lake First Nation, standing in the Manitoba Legislative Assembly with a single feather in his hand, refusing consent to hold a vote on a resolution to ratify the Meech Lake Accord.
He describes his involvement in legislation related to human rights and the Marital Property Act, and offers insight on economic and political issues of the period such as the CF-18 fiasco and the Meech Lake Accord.