Melanesian

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Mel·a·ne·sian

 (mĕl′ə-nē′zhən)
adj.
Of or relating to Melanesia or its peoples, languages, or cultures.
n.
1. A member of any of the indigenous peoples of Melanesia.
2. A subfamily of the Austronesian languages that includes the languages of Melanesia.

Melanesian

(ˌmɛləˈniːzɪən)
adj
(Languages) of or relating to Melanesia, its people, or their languages
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Melanesia: generally Negroid with frizzy hair and small stature
2. (Languages) a group or branch of languages spoken in Melanesia, belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian family
3. (Languages) See also Neo-Melanesian
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Melanesian - of or relating to Melanesia or its people or culture
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Tambo is Melanesian for taboo, and is first cousin to that Polynesian word.
It was really a pretty face, viewed by any standard, and for a Melanesian it was a remarkably good-looking face.
It is an atoll, while the Solomons are high islands; and its people and language are Polynesian, while the inhabitants of the Solomons are Melanesian.
That there has been a slight Melanesian drift in the period of the northwest monsoon, is also evident.
In this the ancient was in nowise unlike the rest of his dark- skinned Melanesian race.
One of his tambos (tambo being beche-de-mer and Melanesian for "taboo") was that water unavoidable must never touch his skin.
As plantations spread north along the coast, South Pacific islanders--mainly Melanesians from Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands, as well as smaller numbers of Polynesians and Micronesians from Samoa, Kiribati and Tuvalu--were recruited (or coerced) into leaving their homes for a new life of hard, laborious work.
One could perhaps add Israelis to Bashkow's list of types of whitemen as they too would qualify as a known group of foreigners who are perceived as more successful at 'development' than Melanesians.
From the Melanesians he learned to accept the role of traditional healers, ancestors, and the special knowledge of women; the death of Christ could be interpreted as a version of the Dema story.
Hviding and Berg seek to give Hocart and Rivers their due as one of the first, if not the first, anthropologists to employ the method of participant-observer as they took up long-term residence among the Melanesians in 1908.
What about those from Australasia or Oceania, like the Aborigines of Australia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and the dark-skinned Melanesians of the Pacific?
Early efforts to evangelise Melanesians were based on the genuine belief that 'Christian nations' could be cultivated on a model of pastoral communities applying the gospel in their daily lives, free of materialism, secularism, and sectarian divisions (Hassall 1990).