melodrama

(redirected from Melodramas)
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mel·o·dra·ma

 (mĕl′ə-drä′mə, -drăm′ə)
n.
1.
a. A drama, such as a play, film, or television program, characterized by exaggerated emotions, stereotypical characters, and interpersonal conflicts.
b. The dramatic genre characterized by this treatment.
2. Behavior or occurrences having melodramatic characteristics.

[Alteration of melodrame, from French mélodrame, spoken drama that includes some musical accompaniment, melodrama : Greek melos, song + French drame, drama (from Late Latin drāma; see drama).]

melodrama

(ˈmɛləˌdrɑːmə)
n
1. (Film) a play, film, etc, characterized by extravagant action and emotion
2. (Theatre) (formerly) a romantic drama characterized by sensational incident, music, and song
3. overdramatic emotion or behaviour
4. (Theatre) a poem or part of a play or opera spoken to a musical accompaniment
[C19: from French mélodrame, from Greek melos song + French drame drama]
melodramatist n
melodramatic adj
ˌmelodraˈmatically adv
ˌmelodraˈmatics pl n

mel•o•dra•ma

(ˈmɛl əˌdrɑ mə, -ˌdræm ə)

n., pl. -mas.
1. a dramatic form that exaggerates emotion and emphasizes plot or action over characterization.
2. melodramatic behavior or events.
3. (in the 17th–early 19th centuries) a romantic drama with music interspersed.
[1800–10; < French mélodrame=mélo- (< Greek mélos song) + drame drama]
mel`o•dram′a•tist (-ˈdræm ə tɪst, -ˈdrɑ mə-) n.

melodrama

- Meaning "song play," it has a Greek origin—from melos, "music, song"—and it started out as a sensational play interspersed with songs.
See also related terms for songs.

melodrama

1. a sensational drama with events and emotions extravagantly expressed.
2. an opera or a stage play with songs and music, often of a romantic nature. — melodramatic, adj.
See also: Drama

melodrama

A sensational romantic drama.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melodrama - an extravagant comedy in which action is more salient than characterizationmelodrama - an extravagant comedy in which action is more salient than characterization
comedy - light and humorous drama with a happy ending
Translations
شَبيه بِمَسْرَحِيَّه عاطِفِيَّه
melodrama
melodrama
melodráma
melódrama
melodramamelodramatiškaimelodramatiškas
melodrāmateātris
melodráma
acıklı oyunmelodram

melodrama

[ˈmeləʊˌdrɑːmə] Nmelodrama m

melodrama

[ˈmɛlədrɑːmə] nmélodrame m

melodrama

nMelodrama nt

melodrama

[ˈmɛləʊˌdrɑːmə] nmelodramma m

melodrama

(ˈmelədraːmə) noun
1. a (type of) play in which emotions and the goodness or wickedness of the characters are exaggerated greatly.
2. (an example of) behaviour similar to a play of this sort. He makes a melodrama out of everything that happens.
ˌmelodraˈmatic (-drəˈmӕ-) adjective
ˌmelodraˈmatically adverb
References in classic literature ?
I do not know why my delight in those tragedies did not send me to the volume of his plays, which was all the time in the bookcase at home, but I seem not to have thought of it, and rapt as I was in them I am not sure that they gave me greater pleasure, or seemed at all finer, than "Rollo," "The Wife," "The Stranger," "Barbarossa," "The Miser of Marseilles," and the rest of the melodramas, comedies, and farces which I saw at that time.
It is the custom on the stage, in all good murderous melodramas, to present the tragic and the comic scenes, in as regular alternation, as the layers of red and white in a side of streaky bacon.
It may be necessary to observe, lest there should appear any incongruity in the close of this soliloquy, that Mr Swiveller did not wind up with a cheerful hilarious laugh, which would have been undoubtedly at variance with his solemn reflections, but that, being in a theatrical mood, he merely achieved that performance which is designated in melodramas 'laughing like a fiend,'--for it seems that your fiends always laugh in syllables, and always in three syllables, never more nor less, which is a remarkable property in such gentry, and one worthy of remembrance.
You are like one of the heroes of those silly melodramas Mother used to be so fond of acting in.
Robert Macaire is the hero of two favorite melodramas -- "Chien de Montargis" and "Chien d'Aubry" -- and the name is applied to bold criminals as a term of derision.
Maggie always departed with raised spirits from the showing places of the melodrama.
As I once more shouldered my pack and went my way, the character of the country side began to change, and, from a semi- pastoral heathiness and furziness, took on a wildness of aspect, which if indeed melodramatic was melodrama carried to the point of genius.
This is getting," he remarked, "a little like melodrama.
In the Sentimental Comedy the elements of mirth and romance which are the legitimate bases of comedy were largely subordinated to exaggerated pathos, and in the domestic melodrama the experiences of insignificant persons of the middle class were presented for sympathetic consideration in the same falsetto fashion.
The weather being unusually mild at that time for the season of the year, there was no sleighing: but there were plenty of those vehicles in yards and by-places, and some of them, from the gorgeous quality of their decorations, might have 'gone on' without alteration as triumphal cars in a melodrama at Astley's.
He seemed to remember seeing a melodrama in his boyhood the plot of which turned on that very point.
One evening, tired with his experimenting, and not being able to elicit the facts he needed, he left his frogs and rabbits to some repose under their trying and mysterious dispensation of unexplained shocks, and went to finish his evening at the theatre of the Porte Saint Martin, where there was a melodrama which he had already seen several times; attracted, not by the ingenious work of the collaborating authors, but by an actress whose part it was to stab her lover, mistaking him for the evil-designing duke of the piece.