Melville


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Mel·ville

 (mĕl′vĭl), Herman 1819-1891.
American writer whose experiences at sea provided the factual basis of the highly allegorical novel Moby-Dick (1851). His other works include short stories, such as "Bartleby the Scrivener" (1856), and the novella Billy Budd (published posthumously in 1924).

Mel·vil′le·an (-vĭl′ē-ən) adj.

Melville

(ˈmɛlvɪl)
n
(Biography) Herman. 1819–91, US novelist and short-story writer. Among his works, Moby Dick (1851) and Billy Budd (written 1891, published 1924) are outstanding

Mel•ville

(ˈmɛl vɪl)

n.
1. Herman, 1819–91, U.S. novelist.
2. Lake, a saltwater lake on the E coast of Labrador, Newfoundland, in E Canada. ab. 1133 sq. mi. (2935 sq. km).
Mel•vil′le•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Melville - United States writer of novels and short stories (1819-1891)Melville - United States writer of novels and short stories (1819-1891)
References in classic literature ?
Whitman and Van Velsor, Melville and Gansevoort, were the several combinations which produced these men; and it is easy to trace in the life and character of each author the qualities derived from his joint ancestry.
Allan Melville, great-grandfather of Herman Melville, removed from Scotland to America in 1748, and established himself as a merchant in Boston.
Herman Melville was born in New York on August 1,1819, and received his early education in that city.
This uncle was Thomas Melville, president of the Berkshire Agricultural Society, and a successful gentleman farmer.
When I became interested in the subject towards the end of the eighteen-seventies, Melville Bell was dead; but Alexander J.
Thus, in addition to the cousins Dorothy and Florence, Martin encountered two university professors, one of Latin, the other of English; a young army officer just back from the Philippines, one-time school- mate of Ruth's; a young fellow named Melville, private secretary to Joseph Perkins, head of the San Francisco Trust Company; and finally of the men, a live bank cashier, Charles Hapgood, a youngish man of thirty-five, graduate of Stanford University, member of the Nile Club and the Unity Club, and a conservative speaker for the Republican Party during campaigns - in short, a rising young man in every way.
Melville, the bank cashier, fascinated him, and he resolved to investigate him at the first opportunity.
The winter'll go fast, for Will Melville is going to lend me his mother's sewing machine, and I'm going to make white petticoats out of the piece of muslin aunt Jane sent, and have 'em just solid with tucks.
It is very much," replied Barbicane; "the temperature which was observed in the polar regions, at Melville Island and Fort Reliance, that is 76@ Fahrenheit below zero.
And all this happened far away to the north, beyond Labrador, beyond Hudson's Strait, where the great tides heave the ice about, north of Melville Peninsula--north even of the narrow Fury and Hecla Straits--on the north shore of Baffin Land, where Bylot's Island stands above the ice of Lancaster Sound like a pudding-bowl wrong side up.
In addition to the floe and the pack-ice, the gale and the currents were bringing down true bergs, sailing mountains of ice, snapped off from the Greenland side of the water or the north shore of Melville Bay.
The second, Alexander Melville Bell, was the dean of British elocutionists, a man of creative brain and a most impressive facility of rhetoric.