Menelaus


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Men·e·la·us

 (mĕn′ə-lā′əs)
n. Greek Mythology
The king of Sparta at the time of the Trojan War; husband of Helen and brother of Agamemnon.

Menelaus

(ˌmɛnɪˈleɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a king of Sparta and the brother of Agamemnon. He was the husband of Helen, whose abduction led to the Trojan War

Men•e•la•us

(ˌmɛn lˈeɪ əs)

n.
a legendary king of Sparta, the brother of Agamemnon and husband of Helen of Troy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Menelaus - (Greek mythology) the king of Sparta at the time of the Trojan WarMenelaus - (Greek mythology) the king of Sparta at the time of the Trojan War; brother of Agamemnon; husband of Helen
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations

Menelaus

[ˌmenɪˈleɪəs] NMenelao

Menelaus

[ˌmɛnɪˈleɪəs] nMenelao
References in classic literature ?
Menelaus saw him thus stride out before the ranks, and was glad as a hungry lion that lights on the carcase of some goat or horned stag, and devours it there and then, though dogs and youths set upon him.
Alexandrus quailed as he saw Menelaus come forward, and shrank in fear of his life under cover of his men.
And now can you not dare face Menelaus and learn what manner of man he is whose wife you have stolen?
If you would have me do battle with Menelaus, bid the Trojans and Achaeans take their seats, while he and I fight in their midst for Helen and all her wealth.
He bids the Trojans and Achaeans lay their armour upon the ground, while he and Menelaus fight in the midst of you for Helen and all her wealth.
When they explained why they had called the people together, it seemed that Menelaus was for sailing homeward at once, and this displeased Agamemnon, who thought that we should wait till we had offered hecatombs to appease the anger of Minerva.
Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and found us making up our minds about our course--for we did not know whether to go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to our left, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas.
If Menelaus when he got back from Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there would have been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead, but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures, and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed of great wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, and Aegisthus, who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos, cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.
Meanwhile Menelaus and I were on our way home from Troy, on good terms with one another.
Go to him, therefore, by sea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travel by land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are my sons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives.
It told of the dispute between Agamemnon and Menelaus, the departure from Troy of Menelaus, the fortunes of the lesser heroes, the return and tragic death of Agamemnon, and the vengeance of Orestes on Aegisthus.
As an example of motiveless degradation of character, we have Menelaus in the Orestes: of character indecorous and inappropriate, the lament of Odysseus in the Scylla, and the speech of Melanippe: of inconsistency, the Iphigenia at Aulis,--for Iphigenia the suppliant in no way resembles her later self.