Mercator projection

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Mercator projection

Mercator projection

n.
A cylindrical map projection in which the meridians and parallels appear as lines crossing at right angles and in which areas appear greater farther from the equator. Straight line segments represent true bearings, thus making this projection useful for navigation.

[After Gerhardus Mercator.]

Mercator projection

(mɜːˈkeɪtə)
n
(Physical Geography) an orthomorphic map projection on which parallels and meridians form a rectangular grid, scale being exaggerated with increasing distance from the equator. Also called: Mercator's projection

Merca′tor

(or Merca′tor's) projec`tion,


n.
a conformal map projection on which any rhumb line is represented as a straight line, used chiefly in navigation, though the scale varies with latitude and areal size and the shapes of large areas are distorted.
[1660–70]
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Mercator projection

Mer·ca·tor projection

(mər-kā′tər)
A method of making a flat map of the Earth's surface so that the meridians and parallels appear as straight lines that cross at right angles. In a Mercator projection, the areas farther from the equator appear larger, making the polar regions greatly distorted. Compare conic projection, homolosine projection, sinusoidal projection.

Mercator projection

A type of cylindrical map projection in which the lines of latitude and longitude intersect at right angles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mercator projection - a map projection of the earth onto a cylinderMercator projection - a map projection of the earth onto a cylinder; areas appear greater the farther they are from the equator
map projection - a projection of the globe onto a flat map using a grid of lines of latitude and longitude