mericarp


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mericarp

(ˈmɛrɪˌkɑːp)
n
(Botany) botany one of the one-seeded portions into which a schizocarp splits at maturity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mericarp - a carpel with one seedmericarp - a carpel with one seed; one of a pair split apart at maturity
carpel - a simple pistil or one element of a compound pistil
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1), about a third the total length of the mericarp (Zona et al.
The results of my own experiments with mericarp floatation are shown in Table 1, in which mericarps are shown to float for at least 24 hours, long enough to be carried by water over a considerable distance.
Although Weckerle and Rutishauser (2005) have described the structure of the gynoecium and the fruit ontogenesis of nine Paullinieae species including Urvillea ulmacea, detailed descriptions and illustrations concerning the separation system of mericarp and of dehiscence are lacking.
Houssayanthus, Lophostigma and Serjania are characterized by schizocarpic fruit with winged (samaroid) mericarps, Cardiospermum and Urvillea, by papery, inflated capsules, and Paullinia by capsules.
heliotropioides in having sepals tipped with a purple mucro and relatively short petals, but the mericarp does not resemble either M.
laurifolia in most characters but its mericarp has been modified from the wind-dispersed samara of H.
Unlike most species in the genus, this one is presumably dispersed by water, the wing of the mericarp being reduced to a rudimentary dorsal crest (Fig.
Last segments of the bracts sublinear to thread-like, rays of the flowering umbels arched-convergent; secondary ridges of the mericarp with slender spines, scarcely dilated at the base .
In Euphorbiaceae each mericarp separates from the adjacent mericarps as well as from the central column, when the fruit dries out, dehiscing abruptly along the dorsal suture, so that the seeds are thrown far away (ROTH, 1977).
1/2] = 9-14); and the third category is represented by a single species, Tribulus cistoides, whose woody mericarp containing four to six seeds has an average depth-hardness value of 27.
We have excluded from this treatment schizocarpic fruits with laterally extended mericarp wings, e.
5 x 2 mm spherical mericarp that does not have any specific way of dispersal except for falling from the mother plant.