Merionethshire


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Merionethshire

(ˌmɛrɪˈɒnɪθˌʃɪə; -ʃə)
n
(Placename) (until 1974) a county of N Wales, now part of Gwynedd
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References in classic literature ?
Ramsay has published an account of a downthrow in Anglesea of 2300 feet; and he informs me that he fully believes there is one in Merionethshire of 12,000 feet; yet in these cases there is nothing on the surface to show such prodigious movements; the pile of rocks on the one or other side having been smoothly swept away.
Nearly every village in the slate quarrying areas of Merionethshire and Caernarfonshire had a band and there are still a sizeable number of bands still in being with experienced players and conductors passing on their skills to the younger generation.
lt;B In September 1942, art treasures from the National Gallery were moved to during World War II Manod Quarry slate caverns in Merionethshire for safekeeping Fred Ramage
With a house among tea plantations, the walls decorated with oil paintings of an aristocratic family hailing from the Welsh county of Merionethshire, it is hard to imagine that most of his life has been lived in Africa.
They were on the run for seven days before being captured close to Llanbedr, in Merionethshire, on April 11.
From 1948 Rolt became involved with proposals to revive the Talyllyn Railway in Merionethshire, West Wales, a rare instance of a statutory railway that was not nationalised.
Nationalists' human barrier Eighty Welsh nationalists today formed a human barrier outside the Trawsfynydd military camp, Merionethshire.
Former student Eryl Jones charts his alma mater's rocky road to success ON Friday, September 24, 1971, an Austin 1100 meandered its way through rural Merionethshire, on its way from Ffynnongroyw on the Dee estuary to the university town of Aberystwyth.
Robert Vaughan of Hangar, in his Sketch of the History of Merionethshire, seems to ascribe it's origin to persons frequenting the banks of the Mawddach, "by reason of the herb scurvy-grass, which grows there in great abundance.
Jane Vaughan, from Merionethshire (nee Price), married Royalist Rowland Vaughan ofCaergai (c.
His romantically lush landscapes, especially with those with water, such as The Estuary, Portmeirion, Merionethshire (1959) or of the Venetian lagoon at sunset (1968), are even richer than his architectural images, and his Stonehenge captures the site's primeval magnificence.