metacognition

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Related to Metacognitive: Metacognitive strategies

metacognition

(ˌmɛtəkɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
(Psychology) psychol thinking about one's own mental processes
Translations
métacognition
References in periodicals archive ?
Jess Walter, the New York Times #1 best selling author, will be the keynote speaker, and Cheryl Hogue Smith will lead a pre-conference workshop titled "Interrogating Texts: Taming Chaotic Thought through Metacognitive Revision.
Internal dialogues and rhetoric are presented in intermittent, sequential fashion and described from a metacognitive perspective.
The 4 practices of FUEL Your Life serve to awaken innate metacognitive ability, and is what Charles alludes to when she says, "There is another way to have this human adventure.
This theory is supported by brain images taken when test persons were solving metacognitive tests while being awake.
These metacognitive skills help increase students' self-awareness and understanding about how they learn best.
As mentioned about importance of introducing disorders along with drug consumption, for prevention and treatment, examining drug addicted individuals with respect to social anxiety, metacognitive beliefs and emotion regulation strategies in Iranian population, this study analyzed the role of metacognitive beliefs and emotion regulation strategies in predicting social anxiety in addicted individuals who referred to drug quitting centers in the west of Mazandaran.
ERB (Educational Records Bureau) said it will be using Mattersight Corporation's (NASDAQ: MATR) linguistic and behavioral algorithms to automatically analyze student essays for key metacognitive traits.
With the increased emphasis on informational text with Common Core State Standards and the difficulty many students have with this type of text, this study examined the effects of Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR) on informational text comprehension and metacognitive awareness of fifth grade students.
Yet even this feature is part of Gerber's idiosyncratic style, which is somehow immediately sensory and metacognitive at the same time.
As Peskin and Astington explain, "In the intermediate and later school years, there is the developing understanding of high-level metalinguistic and metacognitive terms such as infer, imply, predict, doubt, estimate, concede, assume, and confirm--terms used in scientific and historical thinking" (254).
Language, as a cognitive function, has a complexity that can only be tackled with the help of effective teaching tools and strategies that can speed up the cognitive and metacognitive processes of the brain.
The key elements of leader readiness development are goal orientation, developmental efficacy, self-concept clarity, leader complexity and metacognitive ability.