metacognition

(redirected from Metacognitive strategies)
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metacognition

(ˌmɛtəkɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
(Psychology) psychol thinking about one's own mental processes
Translations
métacognition
References in periodicals archive ?
Check whether there are significant differences in the use of metacognitive strategies between pupils in early childhood education with high and low academic performance.
The area of regulating cognition includes both cognitive and metacognitive strategies.
Metacognitive strategies are self-monitoring and self-regulating activities, focusing on the process and product of reading.
However, individuals at low-achievement levels benefit from instruction regarding the skills necessary to correctly evaluate themselves as well as how to positively use metacognitive strategies.
When dealing with memory deficits, students with ADHD are unable to hold the directions for simple metacognitive strategies in their memory long enough to practice them (Borkowski et al.
The "skill" component of the general expectancy-value model of SRL consists of three major categories of strategies, including: metacognitive strategies (planning, goal setting, monitoring and self-evaluation), cognitive strategies for learning and comprehending the materials (rehearsal, elaboration and organization), and resource-management strategies (help seeking, environmental management strategies and time management).
Thus, we suggest that this interaction serves as the basis for the development and employment of metacognitive strategies focused on satisfying some motivation, or realizing some cognitive outcome.
Metacognitive strategies make learning relevant and more engaging for students and teachers.
This qualitative case study illustrates and compares the metacognitive strategies that a grade-3 female student used while reading narrative and informational texts.
The researchers advocate that there is a need for many classroom teachers to continue their education to become familiar with the different metacognitive strategies required to be a successful math teacher.
In support of Ellis's (1997) findings, Maimon (2001) demonstrated benefits of culturally based metacognitive strategies for improving the writing skills of students from a non-English speaking background.