meteoroid

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me·te·or·oid

 (mē′tē-ə-roid′)
n.
A solid body, moving in space, that is smaller than an asteroid and at least as large as a speck of dust.

meteoroid

(ˈmiːtɪəˌrɔɪd)
n
(Celestial Objects) any of the small celestial bodies that are thought to orbit the sun, possibly as the remains of comets. When they enter the earth's atmosphere, they become visible as meteors
ˌmeteorˈoidal adj

me•te•or•oid

(ˈmi ti əˌrɔɪd)

n.
any of the small bodies of rock or metal traveling through space that, upon entering the earth's atmosphere, are heated to glowing and become meteors.
[1860–65]

me·te·or·oid

(mē′tē-ə-roid′)
A rocky celestial body that travels through interplanetary space in an orbit that crosses the Earth's orbit. See Note at meteor.

meteoroid

A solid body moving through space that is smaller than an asteroid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meteoroid - (astronomy) any of the small solid extraterrestrial bodies that hits the earth's atmospheremeteoroid - (astronomy) any of the small solid extraterrestrial bodies that hits the earth's atmosphere
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
estraterrestrial body, extraterrestrial object - a natural object existing outside the earth and outside the earth's atmosphere
meteorite - stony or metallic object that is the remains of a meteoroid that has reached the earth's surface
meteor swarm - a group of meteoroids with similar paths
Translations

meteoroid

[ˈmiːtɪərɔɪd] Nmeteoroide m

meteoroid

References in periodicals archive ?
They called "meteoroids"; when meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere, they're called "meteors.
space debris / ground- and space-based debris and meteoroid measurements / in situ radar and optical measurements of debris and meteoroids
gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2000/ast18dec_1) high density of meteoroids and when the Earth passes through the trail around the same time every year, the meteoroids end up in Earth's atmosphere.
Researchers knew that meteoroids often blew up before they reach the Earth's surface, but they did not know why.
In 2005 a sub-stream of unusually large Taurid meteoroids intersected Earth's orbit.
Over the weekend, the meteoroids from Halley's Comet will strike Earth's atmosphere at a speed of 148,000mph, burning up in streaking flashes of light.
The metal comes from a constant rain of tiny meteoroids onto the Red Planet.
Perseid meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere (and are then called meteors) at roughly 60km/sec relative to the planet.
These shooting stars, as magical as they may appear to be magical, are caused when the Earth passes through a stream, or trail, of dust and rocks -- meteoroids -- left behind by the comet Swift-Tuttle as it orbits the sun.
Asteroid and meteoroids are rocky or metallic bodies that orbit the sun.
The origin of sporadic meteoroids is still uncertain.
The search dubbed, Project Dark Flight, is a reference to what happens when meteoroids are able to survive atmospheric reentry, cool down, and fall to Earth at a much lowered velocity.

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