meteoroid

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me·te·or·oid

 (mē′tē-ə-roid′)
n.
A solid body, moving in space, that is smaller than an asteroid and at least as large as a speck of dust.

meteoroid

(ˈmiːtɪəˌrɔɪd)
n
(Celestial Objects) any of the small celestial bodies that are thought to orbit the sun, possibly as the remains of comets. When they enter the earth's atmosphere, they become visible as meteors
ˌmeteorˈoidal adj

me•te•or•oid

(ˈmi ti əˌrɔɪd)

n.
any of the small bodies of rock or metal traveling through space that, upon entering the earth's atmosphere, are heated to glowing and become meteors.
[1860–65]

me·te·or·oid

(mē′tē-ə-roid′)
A rocky celestial body that travels through interplanetary space in an orbit that crosses the Earth's orbit. See Note at meteor.

meteoroid

A solid body moving through space that is smaller than an asteroid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meteoroid - (astronomy) any of the small solid extraterrestrial bodies that hits the earth's atmospheremeteoroid - (astronomy) any of the small solid extraterrestrial bodies that hits the earth's atmosphere
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
estraterrestrial body, extraterrestrial object - a natural object existing outside the earth and outside the earth's atmosphere
meteorite - stony or metallic object that is the remains of a meteoroid that has reached the earth's surface
meteor swarm - a group of meteoroids with similar paths
Translations

meteoroid

[ˈmiːtɪərɔɪd] Nmeteoroide m

meteoroid

References in periodicals archive ?
Meteoroids are pieces of dust or rock which are floating through space.
The larger chunks get deposited like a trail of breadcrumbs along the comet's orbit C a field of tiny meteoroids in the making.
The origin of sporadic meteoroids is still uncertain.
The search dubbed, Project Dark Flight, is a reference to what happens when meteoroids are able to survive atmospheric reentry, cool down, and fall to Earth at a much lowered velocity.
Eventually, the fragments, which are estimated to weigh 200,000 tons, will provide a rich source of meteoroids.
Spectroscopy is an important aspect of meteor studies as it enables the chemical composition of incoming meteoroids to be determined.
12 and 13, 2013, filling the sky with streaks of light caused by the meteoroids burning up in Earth's atmosphere.
Research so far has shown that loose particles hit by meteoroids settle down into the moon's rock or mineral surface.
When meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere they are called meteors.
The streaks of light you can sometimes see in the night sky are caused by tiny bits of dust and rock called meteoroids falling into the Earth's atmosphere and burning up.
There are representative poems by the brightest stars in the Anglo-American poetry constellation (Yeats, Eliot, Stevens, and more), but even more welcome are the little meteoroids of verse by more or less well-known poets like Maria Hummel, Leroi Jones, Donald Justice, Mary Karr, August Kleinzhaler, William Matthews, and Eleanor Wilner.

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