Methodistic


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Related to Methodistic: Presbyterian

Meth·od·ist

 (mĕth′ə-dĭst)
n.
1. A member of an evangelical Protestant church founded on the principles of John and Charles Wesley in England in the early 1700s and characterized by active concern with social welfare and public morals.
2. methodist One who emphasizes or insists on systematic procedure.

Meth′od·is′tic adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Later that same year, when the General Synod refused to acknowledge its errors, Wyneken denounced the General Synod as "Reformed in doctrine, Methodistic in practice, and laboring for the ruin of the Church, whose name she falsely bears.
But in high schools and universities, the desire to educate, the social imperative to transmit knowledge, more often than not takes this Methodistic form.
As the 19th-century Holiness Movement in America matured, it formed itself into four clusters of churches: Wesleyan-Holiness groups with Methodistic roots, those with a nonMethodist heritage who adopted the Wesleyan doctrine of holiness and its practice of revivalism, those who added tongues-speaking to the Wesleyan tradition, and those who embraced Keswick teachings (Tracy & Ingersol, 1998).
In public, during his last twenty years, he was scrupulously polite, benign, and noncombative, but with Horace he could erupt at "the damnable Methodistic, Presbyterianistic god," call President Harrison a "shit-ass," pronounce Henry James "only feathers," and joke about ramming a needle up the ass of a slow printer.