metrist

metrist

(ˈmɛtrɪst)
n
(Poetry) prosody a person skilled in the use of poetic metre

met•rist

(ˈmɛ trɪst, ˈmi trɪst)

n.
a person who is skilled in the use of poetic meters.
[1525–35; < Medieval Latin]
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References in periodicals archive ?
20) Remarkably, Jebb observes Tennyson's virtues in nearly identical terms: "As a metrist, he is the creator of a new blank verse.
Ian will be joined on the panel by Avery Cohen, Principal at Metrist Partners.
Yet an appreciation of each poet's artistic stance and personal circumstances is crucial to any convincing interpretation of Faure's music, for every setting represents both close collaboration and creative colloquy between metrist and composer.
Auden, no mean metrist, used rhyme royal rather than ottava rima in his "Letter to Lord Byron.
For Wordsworth meter can control and regulate the exciting and painful passions stirred by the incidents of the poem; he is such a subtle metrist, however, that he can and does do the opposite, as Brennan O'Donnell demonstrates in The Passion of Meter, where he sees Wordsworth tempering and restraining passion by meter and also, where necessary, spurring it by meter.
Indeed, Larkin's unusual skill as a metrist has not gone unnoticed: David Timms, for example, remarks of "Talking in Bed" (CP 129) that "[t]he impression of someone speaking, or rather thinking, is achieved through subtle modifications in rhythm" (107) and David Lodge points out that the impressive peroration of "Mr.
Immediately after the publication of the papers by Wimsatt and Beardsley and Halle and Keyser, there was a great outcry in the metrist community: these people were robbing metrists of their right to say whatever they like and be irrefutable.
From my own point of view - that of an unreconstructed literary metrist and applied prosodist - it is not rules that will help most readers to get the hang of, say, iambic pentameter, not rules that prescribe and forbid, but orderly and accurate description that tells us what happens rhythmically in poems that use this meter.
For just as the editor must be a student of metre, the metrist needs to be a textual critic.
24) A disciple of Swinburne (as well as his patron), Watts-Dunton professes faith in poetry as a way of approximating the rhythms of life: "Deeper than all the rhythms of art is that rhythm which art would fain catch, the rhythm of nature; for the rhythm of nature is the rhythm of life itself," he writes, assimilating but also subordinating the laws of meter to natural rhythm: "Being rhythm, it is of course governed by law, but it is a law which transcends in subtlety the conscious art of the metrist, and is only caught by the poet in his most inspired moods" (p.
Two generative metrists, Chris Golston & Tomas Riad, gave there a paper: "Empirical Arabic metrics--implications for a general model" (A different presentation of their findings is available in Golston and Riad, online).
Generative metrists rightly claim that this solution does not work in many instances.