Maitreya

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Related to Metteyya: Maitreya Buddha

Maitreya

(miˈtreːjə)
n
(Buddhism) the future Buddha
[Sanskrit]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Maitreya - the Bodhisattva who is to appear as a Buddha 5000 years after the death of GautamaMaitreya - the Bodhisattva who is to appear as a Buddha 5000 years after the death of Gautama
References in periodicals archive ?
While she challenges the assumption that their practices are 'inherently millennial', she also refers to cultural sites where weikzas are known to have congregated as they practised and waited for Metteyya, the Buddha-to-come.
Collins for instance, believes that the most widespread goal among practising Buddhists is to be reborn in the times of the future Buddha Metteyya (Skt Maitreya) as it is believed that attaining nibbana will be impossible until then (Collins 1982: 151).
Not only was Dutugemunu reborn in the highest heaven, according to the Mahawamsa; he "will be the first disciple of the sublime Metteyya, the king's father (will be) his father and the mother his mother.
with the development of an ethical society, until a future time when a new cakkavatti and then the Buddha Metteyya (Sanskrit Maitreya) eventually arrives.
as a peta, a poor man, or a type of animal, or the impossibility of meeting the future Buddha Metteyya is mentioned.
In Anagata-vamsa, translated by Collins as "History of the Future" (361), the arrival of the Buddha Metteyya brings tremendous joy (373).
41) One such European 'supplier' was the early British Buddhist convert, Charles Henry Allan Bennett (Ananda Metteyya, 1872-1923), who in 1903 established the Buddhasasana Samagama (International Buddhist Society) in Rangoon, from where he set out on a circuit of missionary tours, including to Britain.
It explains that the beautifully robed and bejewelled women accompanying the Metteyya, the Future Buddha, were rebor n into this celestial state because they had accumulated great stores of merit through their piety and through making daily offerings of cloth, mats, food, fragrances, and flowers to the Buddha, the Dhamma [Buddha's teachings] and the Sangha.