Mexican-American


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Mexican American

n.
A US citizen or resident of Mexican ancestry.

Mex′i·can-A·mer′i·can adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mexican-American - a Mexican (or person of Mexican descent) living in the United StatesMexican-American - a Mexican (or person of Mexican descent) living in the United States
Mexico, United Mexican States - a republic in southern North America; became independent from Spain in 1810
Mexican - a native or inhabitant of Mexico
References in periodicals archive ?
The lawyers who brought the case to the Supreme Court were Mexican-American graduates of the UT law school: Carlos Cadena, Gus Garcia and James DeAnda.
His father was Lalo Guerrero, the legendary Mexican-American musician.
In this regard, the purpose of the article is to discuss considerations related to using Axline's eight principles of play therapy with Mexican-American children.
The State Board of Education is considering creating standards for an official Mexican-American studies high school course, after two failed attempts to approve a textbook for the subject.
Colorado is home to a large and proud Mexican-American community that has played an integral role in our state's history.
Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled that since there was no state law mandating Mexican-American school segregation, the Mendez children could not be segregated.
As a young Mexican-American engaged with students in the Black Power Movement, the birth of gay rights and the rumblings of Chicano labor efforts, Dr.
The authors compared serum PBDE concentrations in a population of 7-year-old first-generation Mexican-American children born and raised in California [Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study] with 5-year-old Mexican children raised in the states in Mexico where most of the mothers had originated (Proyecto Mariposa study).
For the Mexican-American community, we use scale ARSMA (The Acculturation Rating Scale for Mexican-Americans) developed by Cuellar et al.
Their topics include entrepreneurial strategies in 1940s Corpus Christi, how successful female Hispanic entrepreneurs are, determinants of entrepreneurial outcomes for Mexican immigrants in Los Angeles, and Mexican-American entrepreneurship in southwestern Michigan.
AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND MEXICAN-AMERICAN LAW school applicants are more prepared than ever to embark on that step of their education.