mezuzah

(redirected from Mezzuzah)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

me·zu·zah

also me·zu·za  (mə-zo͝oz′ə, -zo͞o-zä′)
n. pl. me·zu·zahs also me·zu·zas (-zo͝oz′əz) or me·zu·zot (-zo͞o-zôt′)
1. A small piece of parchment inscribed with the biblical passages Deuteronomy 6:4-9 and 11:13-21 and marked with the word Shaddai, a name of the Almighty, that is rolled up in a container and affixed by many Jewish households to their door frames in conformity with Jewish law and as a sign of their faith.
2. The container that holds this piece of parchment.

[Hebrew məzûzâ, doorpost, mezuzah; see ḏwḏ in Semitic roots.]

mezuzah

(məˈzʊzə; -ˈzuː-; Hebrew məzʊˈzɑ; Yiddish məˈzʊzə)
n, pl -zuzahs or -zuzoth (Hebrew -zuˈzɔt)
1. (Judaism) a piece of parchment inscribed with biblical passages and fixed to the doorpost of the rooms of a Jewish house
2. (Judaism) a metal case for such a parchment, sometimes worn as an ornament
[from Hebrew, literally: doorpost]

me•zu•zah

art at miasma

or me•zu•za

(məˈzʊz ə, -ˈzu zə)

n., pl. -zu•zoth, -zu•zot (-zuˈzɔt) -zu•zahs or -zu•zas.
Judaism. a parchment scroll inscribed with Deut. 6:4–9 and 11:13–21 and with the word Shaddai (a name for God), inserted in a case and attached to the doorpost of the home.
[1640–50; < Hebrew məzūzāh literally, doorpost]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mezuzah - religious texts from Deuteronomy inscribed on parchment and rolled up in a case that is attached to the doorframe of many Jewish households in accordance with Jewish lawmezuzah - religious texts from Deuteronomy inscribed on parchment and rolled up in a case that is attached to the doorframe of many Jewish households in accordance with Jewish law
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
Book of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomy - the fifth book of the Old Testament; contains a second statement of Mosaic law
References in periodicals archive ?
In response to the suggestion that women should be exempt from affixing a mezzuzah, just as they are exempt from the study of Torah, because the two mizvot appear in consecutive verses (Deuteronomy 11:19 and 20), the gemara says: "You cannot think so, because it is written: "And you shall write them upon the mezuzot of your house .
The pillars and walls of the synagogue are still standing, the slot in the wall for the mezzuzah, and the mikva (ritual bath) may be seen.
At Sari's, I look at mezzuzahs, candlestick holders, other artifacts of Jewish observance.