mezuzah

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me·zu·zah

also me·zu·za  (mə-zo͝oz′ə, -zo͞o-zä′)
n. pl. me·zu·zahs also me·zu·zas (-zo͝oz′əz) or me·zu·zot (-zo͞o-zôt′)
1. A small piece of parchment inscribed with the biblical passages Deuteronomy 6:4-9 and 11:13-21 and marked with the word Shaddai, a name of the Almighty, that is rolled up in a container and affixed by many Jewish households to their door frames in conformity with Jewish law and as a sign of their faith.
2. The container that holds this piece of parchment.

[Hebrew məzûzâ, doorpost, mezuzah; see ḏwḏ in Semitic roots.]

mezuzah

(məˈzʊzə; -ˈzuː-; Hebrew məzʊˈzɑ; Yiddish məˈzʊzə)
n, pl -zuzahs or -zuzoth (Hebrew -zuˈzɔt)
1. (Judaism) a piece of parchment inscribed with biblical passages and fixed to the doorpost of the rooms of a Jewish house
2. (Judaism) a metal case for such a parchment, sometimes worn as an ornament
[from Hebrew, literally: doorpost]

me•zu•zah

art at miasma

or me•zu•za

(məˈzʊz ə, -ˈzu zə)

n., pl. -zu•zoth, -zu•zot (-zuˈzɔt) -zu•zahs or -zu•zas.
Judaism. a parchment scroll inscribed with Deut. 6:4–9 and 11:13–21 and with the word Shaddai (a name for God), inserted in a case and attached to the doorpost of the home.
[1640–50; < Hebrew məzūzāh literally, doorpost]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mezuzah - religious texts from Deuteronomy inscribed on parchment and rolled up in a case that is attached to the doorframe of many Jewish households in accordance with Jewish lawmezuzah - religious texts from Deuteronomy inscribed on parchment and rolled up in a case that is attached to the doorframe of many Jewish households in accordance with Jewish law
section, subdivision - a self-contained part of a larger composition (written or musical); "he always turns first to the business section"; "the history of this work is discussed in the next section"
Book of Deuteronomy, Deuteronomy - the fifth book of the Old Testament; contains a second statement of Mosaic law
References in periodicals archive ?
To emphasize the authority of traditional Jewish religious law for the Jews in Algeria, Gautier specifies in the stage directions to the second act, which takes place at the home of Nathan, that a mezzuzah hangs on the doorpost to the house: "est suspendu dans un etui de bois, suivant la coutume juive, un rouleau de parchemin contenant des extraits du Talmud" (7).
As he kissed the mezzuzah on his way out the door to confront a throng of supporters and reporters, Lieberman was about to become not quite the most famous American Jew (Bob Dylan, Barbara Walters, Jerry Seinfeld, Monica Lewinsky, Arthur Miller, and Barbra Streisand could probably boast higher celebrity quotients), but at least the American most famous for being a Jew.
In response to the suggestion that women should be exempt from affixing a mezzuzah, just as they are exempt from the study of Torah, because the two mizvot appear in consecutive verses (Deuteronomy 11:19 and 20), the gemara says: "You cannot think so, because it is written: "And you shall write them upon the mezuzot of your house .