Micmac

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Mic·mac

 (mĭk′măk′)
n.
Variant of Mi'kmaq.

Micmac

(ˈmɪkmæk)
npl -macs or -mac
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people formerly living in the Maritime Provinces of Canada
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family

Mic•mac

(ˈmɪk mæk)

n., pl. -macs, (esp. collectively) -mac.
1. a member of an American Indian people of the Maritime Provinces and the Gaspé Peninsula.
2. the Algonquian language of the Micmac.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Micmac - a member of the Algonquian people inhabiting the Maritime Provinces of CanadaMicmac - a member of the Algonquian people inhabiting the Maritime Provinces of Canada
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
2.Micmac - the Algonquian language of the Micmac
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
References in periodicals archive ?
He was executive director and artistic director of the film Spirit World--The Story of the Mi'Kmaqs and wrote a book of history about the Mi'kmaq people.
He was executive director and artistic director of the film Spirit World-The Story of the Mi'Kmaqs and wrote a book of history about the Mi'Kmaq people.
France did not recognize the oath and continued to regard the Acadians as French subjects, and Acadian relations with the Mi'kmaqs remained friendly.
English ships were already in the Bay of Fundy trading with the Mi'kmaq Indians when the first French colonists arrived, but it was the French who made the first settlement at Port Royal, now Annapolis Royal.
Marshall, the son of a late grand chief of the Mi'kmaq nation, fought the charges, supported by thirteen chiefs, the Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaqs and the Union of Nova Scotia Indians.
This has not been so for a Mi'kmaq Indian named Donald John Marshall Jr.
Technical people working for the Mi'kmaqs were still analyzing the report when, Christmas said, the company approached the chiefs with a request that they agree to allow the project to go ahead.
The agenda for the forum has yet to be finalized, but it is the opinion of the Mi'kmaq that topics such as self government and treaties, economic development, natural resources, education, social programs, health and justice should all be areas of concern, said Donald Julien, executive director of the Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaqs.