Miasmatist

Related to Miasmatist: miasmatic, miasmas

Mi`as´ma`tist


n.1.One who has made a special study of miasma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Florence Nightingale was a miasmatist, believing that diseases spread by emanations given off by the environment (essentially bad air) and particularly by poor hygiene.
For the miasmatist, disease was not passed from person to person but rather from environment to person.
Good hygiene, with its reliance on the old miasmatist ideals of fresh air and cleanliness, could now prevent the spread of contagious germs, blending the two older theories together.
Miss Rosa makes Quentin go with her to break into Sutpen's house and Quentin becomes exposed to the most unhygienic of all things, that which both miasmatists and contagionists would agree harbors sickness: Henry's dying body.
In the final decade of the nineteenth century the germ theory of disease gradually became the dominant scientific paradigm of infection, replacing the contagionist and miasmatist theories that had previously been regarded as scientific orthodoxy.
Over the next three decades Smith dedicated much of his working life to the miasmatist cause.
This was an especially important function since the majority of Victorian health professions were miasmatists, meaning they believed diseases could be spread through "bad air.
The miasmatists stab a microscope into a living louse to
In 1894, the battle was between the new "germ theory" scientists such as Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch and their followers, and the miasmatists, those who held that disease was caused by bad air, or bad water, or bad soil.
Historians have tended to divide disease theorists into rival camps: miasmatists versus contagionists.
To confirmed miasmatists even conservatories were suspect.
In country districts miasmatists targetted mists and fogs; in towns they attacked smells.