Micawber


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Micawber

(mɪˈkɔːbə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a person who idles and trusts to fortune
[C19: after a character in Charles Dickens' novel David Copperfield (1850)]
Miˈcawberish adj
Miˈcawberism n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Micawber - fictional character created by Charles DickensMicawber - fictional character created by Charles Dickens; an eternal optimist
References in classic literature ?
Micawber, 'that your peregrinations in this metropolis have not as yet been extensive, and that you might have some difficulty in penetrating the arcana of the Modern Babylon in the direction of the City Road, - in short,' said Mr.
There were two other children; Master Micawber, aged about four, and Miss Micawber, aged about three.
Micawber being in difficulties, all considerations of private feeling must give way.
Micawber had been an officer in the Marines, or whether I have imagined it.
Micawber in reference to my age, or whether she was so full of the subject that she would have talked about it to the very twins if there had been nobody else to communicate with, but this was the strain in which she began, and she went on accordingly all the time I knew her.
Micawber would make the most heart-rending confidences to me; also on a Sunday morning, when I mixed the portion of tea or coffee I had bought over-night, in a little shaving-pot, and sat late at my breakfast.
Micawber, 'I make no stranger of you, and therefore do not hesitate to say that Mr.
Micawber now, and begged her to make use of me to any extent.
Micawber had a few books on a little chiffonier, which he called the library; and those went first.
Micawber was waiting for me within the gate, and we went up to his room (top story but one), and cried very much.
Micawber, came in from the bakehouse with the loin of mutton which was our joint-stock repast.
Micawber resolved to move into the prison, where Mr.