microteaching

(redirected from Micro-teaching)

mi·cro·teach·ing

 (mī′krə-tē′chĭng)
n.
A method of practice teaching in which a videotape of a small segment of a student's classroom teaching is made and later evaluated.
References in periodicals archive ?
That may surprise many teacher educators, who believe that they made use of such a design years ago, adopting the model advocated by Joyce and Showers (1982) or using some form of micro-teaching (Klinzing & Floden, 1991).
Graphics in computer graphics design is generated into an algorithm and small micro-teaching modules are designed for teachers to use directly in teaching, which enables students to feel immersive and more intuitively view the course of the algorithm execution.
During this period I was able to develop competencies in case identification and management of nutrition follow up of cases by conducting home visits and nutrition counseling, health promotion through micro-teaching, enhancing community participation in their own health, clinic organization, record keeping and report writing.
The sessions included simulations of micro-teaching lessons on shared reading and writing, group guided reading and phonics.
Furthermore, in the context of this study, the behavior of micro-teaching is theoretically a component of the social environment.
More specifically and following the method of content analysis, the literature review of relevant published books brings out that in the field of micro-teaching research, in 1993 the book of John Vrettos, a professor of the Faculty of Education in University of Athens, entitled "Non-verbal Behavior and Communication in the classroom- Practice with micro-teaching" was published in Greece.
In their professional studies classes and in method classes, teacher candidates engage in micro-teaching, project and unit development, subject matter portfolios, group research, presentations, and other activities.
Traditionally, pre-service teachers enrolled in the course receive feedback from peers and instructors immediately after their micro-teaching sessions or from their supervising teachers during field-teaching.
In another study, Pringle, Dawson, and Thomasenia (2003) investigated the use of technology by pre-service teachers when incorporated into micro-teaching activities in science, mathematics, and educational technology courses.
This investigation studied prospective teachers' development of reform-oriented teaching through Micro-teaching Lesson Study [MLS], an experience based on Japanese lesson study (Stigler and Heibert, 1999).
Assignments in the course include preparing a micro-teaching lesson in the student's content area with modification apparent; another is a child advocacy project where students interview an outside agency about a particular disability and then prepare a product aimed at advocacy for that particular disability.