ampere

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am·pere

 (ăm′pîr′)
n. Abbr. A
The basic unit of electric current, equal to one coulomb per second and equivalent to the current, flowing in two straight parallel wires of negligible cross section separated by a distance of one meter, that produces a force between the wires of 2.0 × 10-7 newtons per meter of length. The value of an ampere in the International System differs very slightly from that in the meter-kilogram-second-ampere system of units. See Table at measurement.

[After André Marie Ampère.]

Ampère

(ˈæmpɛə; French ɑ̃pɛr)
n
(Biography) André Marie (ɑ̃dre mari). 1775–1836, French physicist and mathematician, who made major discoveries in the fields of magnetism and electricity

ampere

(ˈæmpɛə)
n
1. (Units) the basic SI unit of electric current; the constant current that, when maintained in two parallel conductors of infinite length and negligible cross section placed 1 metre apart in free space, produces a force of 2 × 10–7 newton per metre between them. 1 ampere is equivalent to 1 coulomb per second
2. (Units) a former unit of electric current (international ampere); the current that, when passed through a solution of silver nitrate, deposits silver at the rate of 0.001118 gram per second. 1 international ampere equals 0.999835 ampere
Abbreviation: amp Symbol: A
[C19: named after André Marie Ampère]

am•pere

(ˈæm pɪər, æmˈpɪər)

n.
the SI unit of electrical current, equal to a constant current that would produce a force of 2 x 10−7 newton per meter of length when maintained in two straight parallel conductors of infinite length and negligible circular cross section and placed one meter apart in a vacuum. Abbr.: A, amp.
[1881; after A. M. Ampère]

Am•père

(ˈæm pɪər, æmˈpɪər, Fr. ɑ̃ˈpɛr)

n.
André Marie, 1775–1836, French physicist.

am·pere

(ăm′pîr′)
A unit used to measure electric current. Electric current is measured by how great a charge passes a given point in a second. One ampere is equal to a flow of one coulomb per second.

ampere

1. The unit of electric current in the international system.
2. (A) The unit for measuring electric current.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ampere - a former unit of electric current (slightly smaller than the SI ampere)ampere - a former unit of electric current (slightly smaller than the SI ampere)
current unit - a measure of the amount of electric charge flowing past a circuit point at a specific time
2.ampere - the basic unit of electric current adopted under the Systeme International d'Unitesampere - the basic unit of electric current adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites; "a typical household circuit carries 15 to 50 amps"
current unit - a measure of the amount of electric charge flowing past a circuit point at a specific time
milliampere, mA - one thousandth of an ampere
abamp, abampere - a unit of current equal to 10 amperes
Translations
ampér
ampere
amper
ampeeri
amper
amper
amper
アンペア
amper
ampér
amper
ampere

ampere

ampère [ˈæmpɛəʳ]
A. Namperio m
B. CPD ampere-hour Namperio-hora m

ampere

ampère [ˈæmpɛər] (British) nampère m

ampère

(ˈӕmpeə) noun
(also amp (ӕmp) ) (often abbreviated to A when written) the unit by which an electric current is measured.
References in periodicals archive ?
So, for example, if the quiescent power is a microamp, then even if the load pulls only a nanoamp, ifs still going to consume a microamp of current.
This means the average current consumption of these devices is usually in the microamp range, so that even the smallest solar panel can easily keep these devices' small supercaps topped off.
Many instruments cannot make these low-level current measurements in the microamp range, and some cannot in the milliamp range.
Microamp supply current has been the norm for MR sensor designs until the introduction of Honeywell's Nanopower Series, which includes two sensors, the SM351LT and SM353LT.
According to Intersil, its DC/DC digital controllers support the AMP Group's microAmp 20 to 25A and megaAMP 40 to 50A standards.
In consumer products, such as smartphones and tablets, where power budgets are measured by the nanoamp, there will be an increased demand for component manufacturers to design in sensors that will only require nanoamp power instead of today's microamp and milliamp supply currents.
2-ml microAmp reaction tubes with caps (AB P/N N801-0540) using the following conditions (recommended by the manufacturer, Applied Biosystems): 95[degrees]C for 11 min, 28 cycles of 94[degrees]C for 1 min, 59[degrees]C for 1 min and 72[degrees]C for 1 min, 60[degrees]C extension for 60 min and 2-8[degrees]C until samples were analyzed further.
A coin-sized Bluetooth transceiver in the vest feeds the electrodes with a 10 microamp current.
Freescale's Kinetis K10 family, for example, offers 10 low-power modes with power and clock gating for optimal peripheral activity and recovery times with stop currents in the nanoamp range and run currents in the microamp range.
ST has implemented the hardwired finite state machine, at the core of the S-Touch family, in optimized silicon, which requires very little power: consumption is around five to ten times lower than conventional touch-sensor solutions, with a sleep-mode consumption of just 1 microamp.
ORCA allows current measurements in the range of hundreds of femtoamps to nearly a microamp, and provides a wide range of current measurement options with near Johnson Noise-limited performance.
5 [micro]L/mL of the internal size marker (GeneScan-500-labeled with the red fluorescent dye 6-carboxy-x-rhodamine) in a MicroAmp Optical 96-well reaction plate (Applied Biosystems).