microeconomics

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mi·cro·ec·o·nom·ics

 (mī′krō-ĕk′ə-nŏm′ĭks, -ēk′ə-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of how businesses, households, and individuals within an economy allocate limited resources.

mi′cro·ec′o·nom′ic adj.

microeconomics

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks; -ˌɛkə-)
n
(Economics) (functioning as singular) the branch of economics concerned with particular commodities, firms, or individuals and the economic relationships between them. Compare macroeconomics
ˌmicroˌecoˈnomic adj

mi•cro•ec•o•nom•ics

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˌɛk əˈnɒm ɪks, -ˌi kə-)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the branch of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a firm. Compare macroeconomics.
[1945–50]
mi`cro•ec`o•nom′ic, adj.

microeconomics

the division of economics dealing with particular aspects of an economy, as the price-cost relationship of a business. Cf. macroeconomies. — microeconomist, n. — microeconomic, adj.
See also: Economics

microeconomics

A branch of economics dealing with the study of units within the economy, e.g. firms, markets, and individual consumers.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firmsmicroeconomics - the branch of economics that studies the economy of consumers or households or individual firms
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Translations

microeconomics

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] NSINGmicroeconomía f

microeconomics

[ˌmaɪkrəˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] nmicroéconomie f, micro-économie f

microeconomics

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˌiːkəˈnɒmɪks] nsgmicroeconomia
References in periodicals archive ?
Within the framework of textbook microeconomic theory, this happens when the "elasticity of substitution" in the production function is greater than one: Capital can be substituted for labor, imperfectly, but with a small enough decline in the rate of return so that the share of capital increases with greater capital intensity.
The text assumes some background in intermediate microeconomic theory (at least one semester of principles of microeconomics).
He has authored and coauthored a number of books, including Microeconomics (2013), Lectures on Antitrust Economics (2006), and Microeconomic Theory (1995).
In chapters one to five, Rubinstein discusses various concepts related to microeconomic theory and tries to make them simple for the reader by relating the concepts to his personal experiences.
Andrew Yuengert, professor of economics at Seaver College, Pepperdine University, has produced a remarkable book in which he not simply shows how practical wisdom can or should guide decisions but in which he integrates it into the axioms on which the microeconomic theory of choice is founded.
Diamond specializes in the application of microeconomic theory and econometric methods to employment practices and damage calculations in employment disputes.
Modern microeconomic theory is largely derived from Leon Walras' classic Elements of Pure Economics (1874) which posited free, open markets with perfect and symmetric information and utility-maximizing and profit-maximizing agents.
The book's introduction states the authors' cote thesis: standard textbook treatments of microeconomic theory are an ideologically-motivated distortion of economics, and these caricatures cause great harm by instilling in practitioners and policy-makers a confidence in market mechanisms that is not justified by serious economic inquiry.
Amazingly, our high schools and colleges really don't teach it--outside of basic microeconomic theory.
Economic theory, ranging from mostly theoretically based history of economic thought, up to the algebraically based microeconomic theory, is a demanding area of economic knowledge, seeks new methods how to make the subject close to students in the Bologna style of teaching and examining.
11) Neoclassical economists like Alfred Marshall assumed that firms maximized, but offered no microeconomic theory of the firm.
It applied microeconomic theory and concluded that Morry was right to be skeptical about the likelihood that a seller would actually lose volume in the event of a buyer's breach.